Lab2-PetGeoKey - PGF. Elli Engineering, Energy and the...

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Unformatted text preview: PGF. Elli Engineering, Energy and the Enviroiunent Spring Bill l PETROLEUM SCIENCE AND TECH Notoov lNSTITUTE Topic: Petroleum Geology — Petroleum Systems Analysis Developed by Jon Olson Associate Professor, Petroleum Si Geosvstems Engineering The University of Texas at Austin OvEevIEw It takes many special circumstances to convert "typical geology" into an oil reservoir. The set of Circumstances can be described as a petroleum system. We are going to look at an example from West Texas to illustrate the different components required for successful hydrocarbon accumulation. Learners are expected to: :- identify components of a petroleum system - examine the importance of timing for the events that make up a petroleum system Activig ENGAEE Texas is one of the largest petroleum producing regions in the world. We would like to become familiar with some of its major oil fields. Using the maps from the Atlas of Major Texas Dil Reservoirs, we will collect some data on some oilfield characteristics. The table on the next page has 13 oilfields or plays indicated, with incomplete information. [want you to fill in all the data for any 6 of the indicated locations. You can choose however you want - there might be an oilfield near your home that you would like to learn more about. Here is a brief definition of each category for which you need an answer: Field name — given for some plays, but left blank on some so that you can pick a given field from the map Location - given Plainyng nge — a play is a general description term for the type of geologic environment common to all fields within the play, such as “Austini’Eluda fractured choiif' or “Frio Fluviolffleiroic". The rock type is simply sandstone, limestone, etc. Both of these should come from Plate 1 Producing Stratigraghic Unit ,{ Age — the producing unit is the rock in which the oil is stored, and stratigraphic name is its geologic formation name, such as the Paluxy or the Woodbine. The Age is its geologic age, such as Jurassic, Ordovician, etc... Tragging Mechanism — this is the mechanism by which the oil is trapped in the reservoir, such as folding [an anticlinei, a salt dome, an unconformity or pinchout, etc. Drive Mechanism - this is the mechanism that gives the oil its energy to produce up the wellbore to the surface, such as water drive, gas expansion, etc. We'll do another lab to illustrate this later. Dr. Jon E. Olson l PGE sin I Engineering. Energy and the Environment Spring Edi | Using the__plates,r’maps from the Atlas of Texas Oil Fields, complete E- at the lines pelew. Producing Strat. F‘Ia'i.I I Rock Type Unit Bl. Age Trapping Drive nggtien Plate 1 _ Plate 3 Meena nism Mechanism Le ngviewl Tit Field Name East Texas Field Giddings Fayette COL] fit-3,.I Spraperw Midland lib.r Trend Fiiercement Salt Dames Spindletop Jefiersen cw Frin Barrier,Ir Strand plain NE Edrpus Christi N. of Hpustnn 'fegua Deep- seated Salt Dome Permian “fates Area Basin I ' Permian San And res Dz nna I ' Basin Arch 1ii'ilassen r33 lturn Cw Panhandle . Panhandle SW of Corpus I Frie Fluvial! Christi Deltaic {Vicksburg Fault zone Ka rn es CW Edwards Restricted Platform _ ' Heusten Frip Deep Seated Salt Do me L) Dr. Jan E. Olsen PGE Sill Engineering. Energy and the Envirorunent Spring 201 i For your 5 fields in the previous table, used the atlas as well as search the web to fill out the table below. _ I—" '|'—Ioii—i Init. —|— |—|— Gravity, Press, Cum ‘ Field degrees psi 'DIP, Produced, Permeability, Recovery Name APE Miy'iBBL MMBEL md Porosit nc m E 2 fi Definitions Depth - how deep the reservoir is buried in ft below the surface Oil Gravity, degrees API — classification of oil, higher APi gravity is thinnerflighter oil, lower API gravity is heavyf'thicker oll Initial Pressure—"virgin" pressure ofthe oil in the reservoir, before production begins DIP - "oil-in-place“, which is the original volume of oil stored in the reservoir rock, of which we will produce some fraction Cum Produced —the cumulative amount of oil that has been produced from this field so far Permeability - flow capacity of the reservoir rock, measured in Darcies {D} or millidarcles {md}, the higher the number the better Porosity — fraction of the rock making up the pore volume, where fluids can be stored Recovery Efficiency — the percentage of DIP that is expected to be recovered from the reservoir Dr. Jon E. Olsen 3 l-‘CiE 331 Engineering. Energy and the Environment Spring 231 l MATERIALS l Kat: et a1. {1334] MPG reprint Explore We are going to use a journal publication for the data for this activity. We are not going to read the entire paper during the activitv, but l would like vou to read the abstract to get some idea what the paper is about. The activity is going to focus on several figures that are in the paper. Figures 23.1 and 23.2 give location maps for the basin, The Central Basin Platform. discussed in the paper. 1. Based on the abstract. what are the formation names and ages for the primarv soufcevock and the primarv reservoir rock? 7 OYd-‘W‘I'fmh \m—r) Or chi-v its-Iich El lent)“ ‘39:” Si: Mia-130m 61?} nip 2. Look at Table 23.1. What is the range of vital statistics for the fields within this petroleum svstem. Reservoir limmgrli— "(fatheh or-Jra:i+-iooti»~brr&, flu-3‘de EH“ 9 ELK \ fit CHI gravity:r I 351“ —? a Trap tvpe 3. Look at the stratigraphic column in Figure 23.4. What are the ages and relative depth positions of the source rock and the reservoir rock? Is there anything unusual about the spatial relationship between source and reservoir with regard to oil migration? Describe. Sou»th H’flLlfi—IE \fficviLBoif (the: o‘k’ reservoir Took ., Nitrate”?! C‘WeEh oil To rBe {'Lmifsh Chemob‘te (Lehman. J so Seems-g Missed wade 1. iii—o {$15,9on3 vac-ks below i 1. Dr. Jon E. Ulson 4 l-‘t'iE 301 Engineering. Energy and the Environment Spring “Eiil l 4. Figure 28.5 is a burial history diagram, showing how deep each formation was through time. The importance of depth with regard to source rock is the corresponding temperature. When does the upper Ordovician source rock enter the “oil window” as indicated on Fig. 28.6 [indicate with both geologic age name and years}? Where is the source rock now with regard to the oil window? How long has this source rock been generating oilr approximately? mafia-«ABE; Sow Gites? fliers iin pii tawdry-ti chm M grit “lung Ocarwi‘oq; log: Cumin gill- fi'LhTEiQSECC j gbgj‘ 2550 than ii iii stairway, so a m The source. rook is g‘ii bags-n Elfihqfiiflt all 4%“ abafi 2‘56 m “GCer Wit-JED 5. The geothermal gra lent assumed for Figure 23.6 was 1.54DFJ'1EiD ft. What is this in “kam? If as indicated in the figure below, the oil window ranges in temperature from about EU” to 130°C. What depth range would that be for our example? 2 i E i g s —.—.- H53 generation Elaborate 3km“ng ' 5. What is the potential for oil generation elow EDGE?! What happens at higher temperatures. according to the diagram hove. foTéc éo‘t: J Clad‘l‘ gripe: o-i {BEWGf-Qfiihfir Al“ her “Jrewpenii uteri— Wfi‘r’fl imvafiicfli Dr. Jon E. Olson 1' c; gsigFie iDFFTiquQ. PGF. 3F]! Engineering. Energy and the Environment Spring lflll 'r'. There is something odd about this play in that the source rock is stratigraphically aboye the reservoir rock. if you didn’t already come up with an answer in question 2, why is this an odd relationship? Look at the structural cross—section in Figure 23.3. Not the location of the Keystone Field. Mm sketch of the field and the layers, including the fauit. Draw an arrow indicating the direction you would infer for the migration of the oil from the source to the reservoir. Is this consistent with fluid densities between oil {migrating fl id] and brine [original pore fluid}? O [b If: a Cicwgfip fingd EFT J “EB Yfiu. Emilika I exiPnZE‘E-Jf “lo the when “Effriéhf'fih /”"“Paielifliql Hfjciii‘w @ctiiwa7 g E. Figure 23.5 plots the Total Organic Carbon [weight Eli-ll for West Texas reseroiyrs [the stars}. What is the range of TDC plotted? How do you think the oxygen content of the depositional enyironment would influence the dualityI of a source rock {not all shales are created equal}? Tog ‘9 i ' r I II Hi i’\ fifties} .gh (Liflefi wodhci. :mC'tpobE iikfiililfloei tril- Qtl§bchx +3): Lat? OWE. (fipjifigéfl) (or?) a belief source (excl-1 enuiromwefi Rder ‘00. axon-J Gray QM». onefi 9. Look at Figure 28.2, which gives the temporal history of the different m jor components of the Simpson-Ellenburger petroleum system. When did the trap form? Why is it important for the trap to form befor oil migration? Ffli-‘lrb. 'EO'VHGCK, Cufecoagh elmé C535 Efifl‘biiflnhfoaj .mhmx 03f 6“ “ET bathe! 51“ QjME-r ahimhfifa is \/ _ impor greenest: yaw meg CLJWQQAB {Cicada i hehh JihQ Vucitx‘%iip {31\$ Dr. Jon E. Uison 5 PUE 3t]! Engineering, Energy and the Environment Spring 2121] 1 It]. See if you can come up with a fist of the important components that make for a successful petroleum system. Then list at least 1 attribute of each of 1“rout components that is necessary for success. Ofénmichsit} BM fewuair \[oflL Wk" $ooé @EosAy it Forwaéoifi ct geCJ {oak 1‘12) his?) “(WECDQZKHY +6) Coilfilio C? i \ CL +131? (filfieowotk (or Sirnxiiiqekpbfi RfifL SEC») 4To (Chit/13m OLA! gre‘Femb‘? cmfie/ G: \MSGI §STL§V¢3 MQSV +3) cones-re oik +3 W“ WG— ff an in raw W we Dr. Jon E. Olson 7" ...
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This note was uploaded on 08/31/2011 for the course PGE 301 taught by Professor Olson during the Spring '11 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Lab2-PetGeoKey - PGF. Elli Engineering, Energy and the...

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