Issue 19 - Julian Savulescu - Yes

Issue 19 - Julian Savulescu - Yes - Text Version English...

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Text Version English Help Searching collections: Article Display Article 13 Publisher Info. Mark article Article format: Select one Should we clone human beings? Cloning as a source of tissue for transplantation Journal of Medical Ethics ; London; Apr 1999; Julian Savulescu ; Volume: 25 Issue: 2 Start Page: 87-95 ISSN: 03066800 Subject Terms: Cloning Medical ethics Transplants Fetuses Tissue Abstract: The most publicly justifiable application of human cloning, if there is one at all, is to provide self- compatible cells or tissues for medical use, especially transplantation. Some have argued that this raises no new ethical issues above those raised by any form of embryo experimentation. Full Text: Copyright British Medical Association Apr 1999 [Headnote] Abstract [Headnote] The most publicly justifiable application of human cloning, if there is one at all, is to provide self-compatible cells or tissues for medical use, especially transplantation. Some have argued that this raises no new ethical issues above those raised by any form of embryo' experimentation. I argue that this research is less morally problematic than other embryo research. Indeed, it is not merely morally permissible but morally required that we employ cloning to produce embryos or fetuses for the sake of providing cells, tissues or even organs for therapy, followed by abortion of the embryo or fetus. (Journal of Medical Ethics 1999;25:87-95) Keywords: Cloning; transplantation; autonomy; embryonic stem cells; fetal tissue; embryo experimentation; abortion; potential Introduction When news broke in 1997 that Ian Wilmut and his colleagues had successfully cloned an adult sheep, there was an ill-informed wave of public, professional and bureaucratic fear and rejection of the new technique. Almost universally, human cloning was condemned.2-6 Germany, Denmark and Spain have legislation banning cloning; Norway, Slovakia, Sweden and Switzerland have legislation implicitly banning cloning.7 Some states in Australia, such as Victoria, ban cloning. There are two bills before congress in the US which would comprehensively ban it.8, 9 There is no explicit or implicit ban on cloning in England, Greece, Ireland or the Netherlands, though in
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England the Human Embryology and Fertilisation Authority, which issues licences for the use of embryos, has indicated that it would not issue any licence for research into "reproductive cloning". This is understood to be cloning to produce a fetus or live birth. Research into cloning in the first 14 days of life might be possible in England.7 There have been several arguments given against human reproductive cloning: 1. It is liable to abuse. 2. It violates a person's right to individuality, autonomy, selfhood, etc. 3. It violates a person's right to genetic individuality (whatever that is-identical twins cannot have such a right).
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This note was uploaded on 08/31/2011 for the course STS 302 taught by Professor Nkriesbert during the Summer '08 term at N.C. State.

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Issue 19 - Julian Savulescu - Yes - Text Version English...

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