1623_Kant - Kant & The Categorical Imperative Deontology-...

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1 Kant The Categorical Imperative • Deontology- rightness and wrongness of acts are determined by the intrinsic quality of the act itself or the kind of act it is. • Deon is derived from the Greek word for duty. • Deontology is the study of duties. • Consequentialist believes in duty as well. Moral duties • Depend on reason not feelings • Basis of duty must be founded on a will that would become a universal law. • Basis of duty not founded on human nature. Immanuel Kant’s Deontological Theory • The standard by which moral reasoning is to be judged is disinterested rationality Or • Pure reason – a priori. This is contrasted against a posteriori which is reasoning from experience. Experience is not relevant to morality.
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2 Pure Reason • Divorced from reality • Cannot include self-interest The Standard • Having a good will. • Having a good will is having good intentions. • One is acting on the basis of having good intentions when one’s acts are performed from duty. Two Types of Imperatives
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This note was uploaded on 09/02/2011 for the course PHI 1623 taught by Professor Miller during the Spring '11 term at Santa Fe College.

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1623_Kant - Kant & The Categorical Imperative Deontology-...

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