ICS 45 - Native Arts of North America Native North American...

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Native Arts of North America
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Native North American Art We concentrate our efforts in looking at the artforms of tribes located in what is now the United States.
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American Indian art is a living art… Artforms that have been made for thousands of years, continue to be made today.
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American Indian art is a living art… Artforms which are the result of trade, exchange and Contact are also being made today.
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American Indian art is a living art… Today’s Native artists use every medium, technique, and tool that is available for artistic expression.
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American Indian art is a living art… After all, this is the 21 st century and Native people live in today’s world.
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Contact brought many changes Changes in lifestyle, natural resources, trade goods, and culture. 16 of the 77 Cherokee alphabetical characters Smallpox
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Changes in artforms… Tiny glass seed beads nearly replaced the use of porcupine quills, seeds, nuts, carved stone and shells as materials to decorate personal clothing and items.
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Changes in clothing… Trade wool (also called Stroud cloth), and colorful calico fabrics have replaced some animal hides, pounded fiber and cotton textiles.
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Changes in design motifs… Traditional design motifs have been altered and modified, at the same time that new ones have been introduced and adapted.
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Changes in artistic mediums… Paintings are made today on canvas and paper, rather than hides and bark.
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Changes in social status… Status could be enhanced through personal displays of trade goods and by incorporating new and exotic motifs and images into work. There are gender distinctions in artforms, some artistic traditions fall into the purview of women’s arts and others, into the realm of men’s arts.
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When viewing a Native artform: We can appreciate the superb, and often ingenious, use of the local mineral, animal and vegetal wealth available to the maker.
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When viewing a Native artform: We can observe how closely the crafts reflect the environment of a particular cultural area.
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When viewing a Native artform: We can recognize that the beauty of the items is a tribute to the skills of the makers and the cultural forces which motivated the artists. Forces which continue to motivate Native artists today.
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There is a tendency to view Native art as curiosities created by people who no longer exist… Such thinking is in error ! These are living cultures, not dead ones!
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Changing Perspectives Native art encompasses the sacred and the secular, the political and domestic, the ceremonial and the commercial. The visual arts have always been conduits of culture within Native communities as traditions are transmitted from one generation to the next.
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secular Art is social, meant to enrich tribal ceremonials It has significance beyond the pictorial or design elements Many artforms personify the forces and phenomena of the natural world. All things have sentience, and
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This note was uploaded on 09/02/2011 for the course ICS 45 taught by Professor Parker during the Summer '11 term at DeAnza College.

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ICS 45 - Native Arts of North America Native North American...

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