3bEstimatingPopulationSize

To think about this another way the real population

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Unformatted text preview: o think about this another way, the real population covers a much larger area than the habitat you thought you were studying. 4. Marked individuals mix randomly with the population at large. If your marked turtles do not move among unmarked turtles, and you recapture them near the place you released them, then recaptured turtles may be overrepresented in your second sample, driving down your population estimate. 5. Marked animals are neither easier, nor harder, to capture a second time. If marking an animal frightens it so that it hides from you a second time, then recaptures will be underrepresented in a second sample. If animals become tame and are easier to recapture, then the opposite error is introduced. 6. Marks do not come off of your marked organisms. Invertebrates molt and shed marks, mammals can wriggle out of their collars, and many things can happen to obscure your marks. If this happens, recaptures will be undercounted, and your estimate will be too high. Biology 6C 69 7. Recapture rates are high enough to support an accurate estimate. The Lincoln...
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This note was uploaded on 09/02/2011 for the course BIOL 6C taught by Professor Sundram during the Spring '09 term at DeAnza College.

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