COGN 20 Section notes

COGN 20 Section notes - COGN 20 Section notes LANGUAGE AND...

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COGN 20 Section notes LANGUAGE AND POWER (Lakoff) - Through language we create power relations throughout society and vice versa. Power perpetuates actions such as inequality. - People who uses language to promote power: politicians, lawyers, advirtisement - Everybody is a politician. In our daily interactions we are manipulating a power relation. We construct and engage in power roles/relations through the micro interactions we have with each other (ex. The role of the teacher and student. Role of the parents to child) - Gender relations constructed by language/power (desperate housewives): Establishing power relations/ dynamics starts off unconsciously through simple interactions. Abbey is representing the “me” of the ideologies of society (social construct) and how she’s handing down the perpetual power dynamics to the younger generations. MEAD: “I” and “Me” - I: reflective self. Remembers experience in memory. How I see through my own memory - Me: more assertive, more in the moment. Not thinking of the later consequences at the present moment - Connection with Burke. The connection of the “I” can be interrelated with SOCIETY. How society sees me is how I reflect on myself. VIDEO: THE N WORD - “taboo” words gain their powers through historical context of the nation - “distorts” the impact of the work of Huckleberry Finn - the tension created by the N word shows how ideologies changed throughout the time period ucsdiv.org
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4/15/11 connecting pieces and concepts throughout. Mead: -Self= socially constructed identity. The self produces the “I”. produced from the processes of human interaction. -ME: correlates with the “self”. Putting yourself in a social environment for you to adapt -the generalized other: a dominant ideology of how we should act (the generalized expectation presented by society) -I: viewing ourselves as an outside entity. A “selfish me” to knowing what I want for m self. The reflective “me.” How do you become object toward our selves. I do something throughout the day, and at the end of the day, I think and reflective upon my actions and think “why did I do that?” - Even though our bodies are destroyed, but our mind is still intact (normal) = diving bell and the butterfly -BOTH the “ME” and “I” are under the ideology of the socially constructed “SELF” Goffman: -the presentation of the self: we present our self’s differently in different circumstances. Diffferent expectations are implied with different group of people (different ideologies) and when we FAIL to present that implied identity, we become embarrassed. -THE GENERALIZED OTHER: gives us the “status quo” of how we should act in different places and times -our selves are products of POSITIONAL IDENTITES. (ex. Me at dorm and me at AKPsi business setting) -embarrasment
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SACKS: -why should we study interaction? : sacks saw an error in analysis (people just over veiled preconceived notion in analysis) -studied LANGUAGE IN USE: “on methodology”
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This note was uploaded on 09/02/2011 for the course COGN 20 taught by Professor Dono during the Spring '07 term at UCSD.

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COGN 20 Section notes - COGN 20 Section notes LANGUAGE AND...

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