Standoff at Roy's Rock

Standoff at Roy's Rock - Standoff at Roys Rock Alabamas Ten...

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Standoff at Roy’s Rock Alabama’s “Ten Commandments judge” finally pushes his cause to the brink. Has he gone too far? TIME By Rebecca Winters September 1, 2003 Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore has long displayed a reverence – or obsession, depending on your point of view – for the Ten Commandments. The Scripture has been a good calling card for Moore, gaining him notoriety far beyond the realm of circuit-court judges after he first decorated his courtroom in 1995 with a hand-carved rosewood plaque bearing God’s laws. He prevailed over civil libertarians who sued for its removal, and rode his fame even further in 2000, when he was elected chief justice of Alabama’s supreme court on the slogan “Roy Moore: Still the Ten Commandments Judge.” But while he earned folk-hero status among Evangelicals and conservatives, last week he finally pushed the legal establishment too far when he ignored a federal court order to remove his largest monument to the Commandments, a 5,280-lb. granite carving known as Roy’s Rock. Moore and some helpers had installed the sculpture in the rotunda of the state’s judicial building during off-hours one night in 2001. In a stunning show of defiance by a jurist, Moore disregarded the urging of all eight of
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Standoff at Roy's Rock - Standoff at Roys Rock Alabamas Ten...

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