researchsummary3 - Sara Beg PSY 2012 Section AW59 Kimberly...

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Sara Beg PSY 2012 Section AW59 Kimberly Renk Djik, C., Koenig, B., Ketelaar, T., & de Jong, P. J. (2011). Saved by the blush: Being trusted despite defecting. Emotion . Retrieved June 09, 2011, from PsycARTICLES database.
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The blush is widely recognized as a sign of embarrassment, but researchers believe that it may also serve as an indicator of sincere regret for a wrong that has been committed. Three previously conducted studies showed that people who blushed after committing a social or moral error tended to be perceived as sincerely apologetic for their actions and therefore seen as more trustworthy than those who did not blush. However, when the intentions of the blushing person are not known, it may lead to suspicion and a lack of trustworthiness. For example, one may wonder if the person is blushing out of embarrassment at the act (or failure to act a certain way) or blushing out of guilt when the act was knowingly committed. In the current study, participants played a computer game against a computerized opponent. At the end of each round, the participants would see an image of their opponents, allowing them to see the opponents’ facial expressions. Some participants were informed beforehand that their opponents were obligated by the experimenter to make a mistake during the game, leaving their motives clear, while others were not, leaving participants to wonder at their motives. Over the course of the game, the opponent always made a mistake during the second round; approximately 50% of the opponents’ images shown afterward were shown to be blushing. Researchers aimed to test three hypotheses over the course of this study: one, a
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researchsummary3 - Sara Beg PSY 2012 Section AW59 Kimberly...

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