Core 3 - Sara Beg Ms. Nelson ENC 1102, Section 29 Core 3...

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Sara Beg Ms. Nelson ENC 1102, Section 29 Core 3 11/16/10
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Works Cited Derenne, Jennifer L., and Eugene V. Beresin. "Body Image, Media, and Eating Disorders." Academic Psychiatry . June 2006. 11 Nov. 2010 <http://ap.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/30/3/257>. This article argues that every society tortures its women in some way, and today America’s torture is an image of unattainable female beauty. Along with obesity, rates of eating disorders are rising, and while the media has always had a hand in shaping society’s perception of the ideal female body, the media is now even more powerful than before. The authors bring up a good point on how the media also sends mixed messages these days, such as a magazine advertising that a woman is beautiful the way she is on the cover, but also claiming to have a fool-proof weight-loss system. This goes hand-in-hand with my point that instead of sending mixed messages, the media should openly embrace the diversity of body types that is out there. Unfortunately, eating disorders are being classified at younger ages and with higher frequency, and everyone, even celebrities like Mary-Kate Olsen, are susceptible to these disorders. Bawdon, Fiona. "No Model for Girls." New Statesman . 1 Oct. 2007: 28. Academic ASAP . Web. 11 Nov. 2010. <http://find.galegroup.com.ezproxy.lib.ucf.edu/gtx/retrieve.do? %2C%2C%29%3AFQE%3D%28KE%2CNone%2C20%29body+image+and+media orla57816&docId=A170115970&docType=IAC>. This article points out how it took two Latin American models to die from eating disorders before society would urge the fashion industry to seriously look into the health of these women. Recommendations to improve their health and help prevent eating disorders includes disallowing anyone under 16 – and therefore anyone with a still-developing body that could go from stick-like to curvy rapidly thanks to adolescence – to walk on the runway. Much evidence now links images presented in the media to the health of teen girls, which provides a supporting view for my argument that there is a direct relationship between the two. This article is
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important because it illustrates just how devastating an idealized body image in the media can be for impressionable young girls. The best recommendation is a code of conduct for airbrushed or photoshopped images that can make an already-thin celebrity look even thinner or a gaunt, anorexic model look healthy; although this is not a clear-cut solution, it is a step in the right direction to promoting a healthier body image. Cornblatt, Johannah. "Rethinking the Freshman 15." Newsweek
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Core 3 - Sara Beg Ms. Nelson ENC 1102, Section 29 Core 3...

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