POSElectoralCollege - POS 2041 Sara Beg There are pros and...

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POS 2041 Sara Beg There are pros and cons to everything in the world; this is a rule without exception. The Electoral College system therefore also has certain faults and certain strengths, leading some to be against it, and some to support it. Some believe that the president should be elected directly through the popular vote because of certain disadvantages and fears produced by the electoral college system, such as the possibility of electing a president “without the absolute majority of popular votes”, also known as a “minority president” (Leip, 2008). This may happen if electoral votes are divided among three or more presidential candidates in such a manner that no one candidate has the majority; this occurred in 1824. It is also possible for a minority president to be elected if “one candidate’s popular support were heavily concentrated in a few States while the other candidate maintained a slim popular lead in enough States to win the needed majority of the Electoral College,” such as in 1888 (Leip, 2008). A more common manner in which a minority president is elected is if a
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This note was uploaded on 09/05/2011 for the course POS 2041 taught by Professor Bass during the Spring '07 term at University of Central Florida.

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POSElectoralCollege - POS 2041 Sara Beg There are pros and...

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