Space - Artwork: Gustave Caillebotte, Paris Street: Rainy...

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Art 100 Instructor: Grambo Space October 26, 2010 I. Space A. Actual Space: the three dimensions in which we live B. Sculpture: the art of carving, casting, modeling or assembling materials into three dimensional figures or forms C. Pictoral Space: illusionistic space or depth of a two-dimensional composition; implied Space Artwork: Raphael, The School of Athens , 1511 II. Methods of Creating Pictoral Space A. Overlapping: objects closer to the viewer prevent the viewer from seeing part or all of the objects behind them B. Vertical Positioning: creating the illusion of space by placing objects designated to be farther away near the upper edge of the picture plane C. Atmospheric Perspective (you have this definition in other outlines) D. Linear Perspective 1. One-Point Perspective Artwork: Raphael, The School of Athens , 1511 2. Two-Point Perspective
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Unformatted text preview: Artwork: Gustave Caillebotte, Paris Street: Rainy Day , 1877 Artwork: Edward Hopper, Night Hawks , 1942 3. Three-point Perspective Artwork: MC Escher, Ascending and Descending , 1960 III. Other Approaches to Space A. Multiple Perspective: depiction of objects or scenes from more than one vantage point Artwork: Pablo Picasso, Ma Jolie , 1912 Example: Egyptian Wall Painting B. Conceptual Representation: use of multiple perspectives to depict objects as they are known to be rather than as they are seen from a single viewpoint C. Optical Representation: depiction of objects as they are actually seen from one viewpoint D. Forced Perspective: using tools of creating pictoral space to create implied space with three-dimensional objects Artwork: Martin Puryear, Ladder for Booker T. Washington , 1996...
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