Ethos, Pathos, Logos handout

Ethos, Pathos, Logos handout - subject in question. By...

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Using rhetoric to drive research (As shown in The Everyday Writer p 115-116) Rhetoric (n) - the art of speaking or writing effectively. (Webster's Definition) To argue or persuade your reader effectively, you must appeal to your reader in effective ways. According to Aristotle, rhetoric is "the ability, in each particular case, to see the available means of persuasion." He described three main forms of rhetoric: Ethos, Logos, and Pathos. In order to be a more effective writer, you must understand these three terms. --The Art of Rhetoric Ethos Ethos is an appeal to the authority or honesty of the speaker. It is how well the speaker convinces the audience that he or she is qualified to speak on the particular subject. It can be done in many ways: By being a notable figure in the field in question, such as a college professor or an executive of a company whose business is that of the subject. By having a vested interest in a matter, such as the person being related to the
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Unformatted text preview: subject in question. By using impressive logos that shows to the audience that the speaker is knowledgeable on the topic. By appealing to a person's ethics or character. Logos Logos is logical appeal, and the term logic is derived from it. It is normally used to describe facts and figures that support the speaker's topic. Having a logos appeal also enhances ethos (see above) because information makes the speaker look knowledgeable and prepared to his or her audience. However, data can be confusing and thus confuse the audience. Logos can also be misleading or inaccurate. Pathos Pathos is an appeal to the audiences emotions. It can be in the form of metaphor, simile, a passionate delivery, or even a simple claim that a matter is unjust. Pathos can be particularly powerful if used well, but most speeches do not solely rely on pathos. Pathos is most effective when the author connects with an underlying value of the reader.--Wikipedia...
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This note was uploaded on 09/05/2011 for the course ENGLISH 102 taught by Professor Bailey during the Spring '11 term at Boise State.

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