PHL211Review - Dostoyevsky: -accepts God but denies...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Dostoyevsky: -accepts God but denies relationship with him -harmony is too pricey, if evil must be forgiven for good to exist, he doesn’t want it to exist -too many harmful acts to make the good right -Ivan proclaims to God is just but rejects the world that he has created (one that allows the suffering of an innocent child) Mackey/McCloskey: -atheist -if man can choose good once or several times, it is possible to always choose it -if god had the power to create man that way and didn’t, he is not benevolent -if god didn’t have that power he is not omnipotent -against free will solution -possibility of no free will in the first place Pike: -“best of all worlds” defense Hume: -there is no real evil( argument to solve problem of evil) -response: this contradicts human nature. we explicitly know and see evil and can easily define it in every day worldly terms. (philo lists sufferings, evidences, etc.) -Demea: but God will rectify these wrongs -Hume: we can’t say for certain that he will or wont
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 2

PHL211Review - Dostoyevsky: -accepts God but denies...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online