Lecture 1Water - Lecture 1Water

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Molecular Biology AND Biochemistry o Dr. Mak Chi ho [email protected] Dr. Michelle Chan
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Aim This course introduces information on the structural and functional properties of biomolecules, the chemistry of macromolecules and their metabolic pathways (the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipid and proteins and enzymology). It also provides an understanding of the molecular mechanisms fundamental to the signal transduction and gene expression processes. Practical sessions are aimed to train students in those laboratory skills that are basic in biochemistry and molecular biology.
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There are two Modules. Module 1: Molecular Biology: Structure of molecules important in the living world: Introduction: Water-the medium of life Structure of Carbohydrate, Lipid, Protein and Nucleic acids How the Protein (Phenotype) are linked with the genomic information (DNA)(Genotype) DNA transcription and translation in prokaryotes. What is the relation between protein structure and its functions? Role of protein (hemoglobin) in oxygen transportation Module 2: Biochemistry (How can protein regulates the cellular activities?) Enzymes, Enzyme Kinetics and Enzyme Regulation. Signal transduction at the cellular level Metabolism of Carbohydrate, Lipid and Proteins.
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Intended Learning Outcomes: 1. Describe structural features of the major macromolecules of life and the significance of stereo-isomers in biological systems. 2. Explain the key processes involved in gene expression in prokaryotes. 3. Explain the chemical properties of enzyme and the impact of different factors on regulation of enzyme activities. 4. Describe the metabolic pathways of carbohydrate, lipid and protein in our body. 5. Search for information and analyze the information critically. 6. Perform simple experiments and adopt a problem-solving approach to experimental data.
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The fifteen most abundant elements in human body: Element Mass of element in a 70-kg person per cent oxygen 43 kg 61.4 carbon 16 kg 22.9 hydrogen 7 kg 10.0 nitrogen 1.8 kg 2.57 calcium 1.0 kg 1.43 phosphorus 780 g 1.11 potassium 140 g 0.200 sulfur 140 g 0.200 sodium 100 g 0.143 chlorine 95 g 0.136 magnesium 19 g 0.0271 iron 4.2 g 0.0060 fluorine 2.6 g 0.0037 zinc 2.3 g 0.0033 silicon 1.0 g 0.0014
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Chemical Composition (You are what you eat) Carbohydrates Proteins Fats Vitamins Minerals (Water?)
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% Body Weight from Specific Tissues Male Female Muscle 45% 36% Bone 15% 12% Total Fat Essential Fat (women need more) Storage Fat 15% 3% 12% 27% 12% (mainly for reproduction) 15% Other Tissues 25% 25% Total 100 100%
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Why water is so important? Living cells are approximately 70% water by weight (human body is about 60% water in adult males and 55% in adult females: Regarding specific tissues: Lean muscle tissue contains about 75% water by weight. Blood contains almost 70% water, body fat contains 10% water and bone has 22% water. Skin also contains much water).
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