iso_participation_study

iso_participation_study - Research for People and the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Research for People and the Planet Who Develops ISO Standards? A Survey of Participation in ISO’s International Standards Development Processes October 2004 Mari Morikawa and Jason Morrison Pacific Institute for Studies in Development, Environment, and Security 654 13 th Street, #104 Oakland, California USA Phone (510) 251-1600 Fax (510) 251-2203 www.pacinst.org
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Who Develops ISO Standards? 2 Background The International Organization for Standardization - also known as “ISO” - began creating technical standards for things like hardware and photo film in the late 1940s. In recent years, however, ISO has been expanding into matters relating to social and environmental policy. ISO is world’s largest international standards developer. The norms established by ISO have a major impact on national and local environmental and social issues. Summary of Findings Although the problem of under-representation by less developed regions has been recognized by the ISO for over 40 years, there has been no significant improvement in participation, as measured by “Participating- membership” in ISO’s Technical Committees – the fora where ISO actually develops its standards. On average, Western Europe represents almost half the voting base in ISO’s standards development work, despite representing approximately six percent of the world’s population. Contrary to popular perception, development of ISO’s environmental management standards is not dominated by industry: while industry does represent the largest single stakeholder group, it only constitutes one third of total participation at international meetings. Together, consultants, registrars, and representatives from standards bodies make up almost 40 percent of the participants attending Technical Committee 207 meetings. In recent years, ISO has taken steps to improve the balance of stakeholder representation in its standard development processes, although these initiatives have yet to demonstrate improvements in historical deficiencies in participation by certain interests, namely government and civil society representatives. Publicly available information on the stakeholder representation in ISO standards development is very limited. There is no consistent and systematic protocol for tracking stakeholder participation, which in turn prevents an assessment of whether, and the degree to which, input from the full range of affected stakeholders is achieved.
Background image of page 2
M. Morikawa and J. Morrison Pacific Institute 3 Table of Contents 1. INTRODUCTION . ................................................................................................................................. 4 2. BACKGROUND . .................................................................................................................................... 5 2.1 B RIEF H ISTORY OF ISO AND ITS N EW D IRECTION .................................................................................... 5 2.2 ISO’ S S TANDARDS D EVELOPMENT P ROCESS ............................................................................................ 7 3. REGIONAL REPRESENTATION IN TECHNICAL COMMITTEES . ........................................... 8 3.1 R ESEARCH A PPROACH ........................................................................................................................... 8 3.2 A NALYSIS ............................................................................................................................................. 8 4. PARTICIPATION IN ISO/TC 207 STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT . ............................................. 14 4.1 R ESEARCH A PPROACH ........................................................................................................................... 14 4.2 A NALYSIS ............................................................................................................................................. 15 4.2.1 Regional Representation at Technical Committee 207 . ............................................................
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/02/2011 for the course SOCIO 201 taught by Professor Johnsmith during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

Page1 / 26

iso_participation_study - Research for People and the...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online