DublinHRSpeech

DublinHRSpeech - 1 The future of work in Ireland: Looking...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 The future of work in Ireland: Looking beyond the myths toward the Big Picture By James Woudhuysen Paper to the 25 th anniversary conference of Industrial Relations News Dublin, Ireland, 24 February 2005 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Future of work in Ireland 27/11/05 page 1 © James Woudhuysen 1. Certainty in the face of multiplying myths Six years ago, the Guardian newspaper in London ran a substantial news report on the spread of Mad Cow disease in Europe. It described how the EU’s most senior scientists had just said that, in some member states, up to 400,000 people in a national population could be exposed to infected material from a single cow. The Guardian did some sums and came up with the headline ‘Millions at risk from CJD, say EU scientists’. i Yet you who are gathered here today are very much alive. So, as a professional forecaster, the first lesson I have to bring to you today is this: in the future, it will be important for you both to collect and to suspect all the forecasts you can. After all, the sheer range of health panics in Western society today must deserve scepticism: An ABC of Health Panics Alcoholism, Anorexia. Avian flu BSE/CJD, Computer games, Disco TB, Deep Vein Thrombosis Falling sperm counts, Gambling, Gases emitted from seats of new cars GM foods, Kitchen sink-bowls Moles, Mobile phones and masts Obesity, Orthorexia, Passive Smoking Pthalates in rubber ducks, the Pill, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, too much or too little Vitamin C Panics apply not just to physical health, but to the mental sort, too. In January 2005, the Harvard Business Review devoted a special issue to the sorely-neglected subject of ‘Managing yourself’. ii There, Edward Hallowell, founder of the Hallowell Center for Cognitive and Emotional Health, Massachusetts, reminded readers that Attention Deficit Disorder afflicted one in every 20 Americans. He went on to argue that, in the workplace, Attention Deficit Trait (ADT), symptomatised by ‘distractibility, inner frenzy and impatience’ and caused by overwork, brain overload and IT, was now of ‘epidemic’ proportions. ‘Addicted to speed, we demand it even when we can’t possibly go faster… As the human brain struggles to keep up, it falters and then falls into the world of ADT…. ‘Employees underachieve, create clutter, cut corners, make careless mistakes, and squander their brainpower. As demands continue to increase, a toxic, high-pressure environment leads to high rates of employee illness and turnover’.’ iii Do we believe the hallowed doctrine of Hallowell – or is he just another quack, peddling his own mythoe?
Background image of page 2
Future of work in Ireland 27/11/05 page 2 © James Woudhuysen 2. Resist the medicalisation of work Like the traffic jam, Hallowell says, ADT is ‘an artifact of modern life’, and it makes our minds ‘fill with noise’. He certainly believes that psychosis is intrinsic to the modern work process . And we can be certain that if this is the case, no workplace should ever be free of third-party experts in the management of
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/02/2011 for the course SOCIO 201 taught by Professor Johnsmith during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

Page1 / 12

DublinHRSpeech - 1 The future of work in Ireland: Looking...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online