Stability in small houses wind bracing

Stability in small houses wind bracing - Stability in small...

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Stability in small houses If our building must be stable and storm proof, that means: • The truss’s do not tip • The roof does not move • The roof is not lifted • outer walls does not tilt • outer walls does not slide • outer walls does not tip Figure 5.l. Possible damage on not storm proof houses.
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To avoid such damage, we must ensure that each building is secured. The rafter must be braced, so they do not fall as domino pieces. The roof construction must be secured to the walls, so it does not slide horizontally by wind pressure and / or lifted by wind suction on the roof. The walls must be supported at the top of the ceiling disc, which would then lead the horizontal loads to the stiffening walls. The walls must be secured for tilting, sliding and lifting. In order to achieve stability in the house, it requires that all the load bearing building components have enough internal strength and are anchored to each other so that there is a load path for the forces so they can get to the foundation. When stability is assured we have to look at whether the proposed designs of the individual elements have resistance enough to absorb the forces that affect them, but all that we will come back to strongly in the course Load bearing construction. 5.1 Roof-and ceiling constructions. The roof construction consists of the trusses with roof covering and wind bracing or stabilizing roofing underlay. It must be stable, coherent and rigid, representing a disc. The disc effect of the roof construction can be achieved by using plywood (plaster) as roofing underlay or use wind bracing. Ceiling construction consists of ceiling tie and the covering, which are mounted on this; it can also be used as wind bracing in order to create disc function, if required. By building on l½ store the ceiling construction also works as a part of the story partition. The roof-and the ceiling constructions function are among other things, to transfer the wind load. This is done by making a load transferred connection between the ceiling construction and the load bearing and stabilizing walls in the house.
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5.2 Walls Outer walls are directly affected by wind forces. They are supported by foundations and ceiling construction, where they deliver the forces. From the ceiling construction, which is attached to all stabilizing walls, the forces are transferred as shear forces (disc function) to the foundations. Figure 5.2.1 wind on the facade. Wind on the facades must be transferred to the stabilizing gables and inner walls perpendicular to facades. The forces are transferred by the ceiling construction (disc function), which leads them to the stabilizing walls. The walls transmit the forces in effect for a “shear wall” (disk function) to the foundations. The ceiling construction supports all the walls at the top of the wall.
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Figure 5.2.2: Wind on the gable Wind on the gables must be transferred to the stabilizing facades and inner walls of the house in the lengthwise direction. The forces again will be transferred through the
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This note was uploaded on 09/04/2011 for the course ATCM 1 taught by Professor Maker during the Spring '11 term at Uni. Aalborg.

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Stability in small houses wind bracing - Stability in small...

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