lecture notes ch. 3

lecture notes ch. 3 - Chapter 3 Title:BusLawSeal.eps...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 3 Court Procedures C HAPTER O UTLINE I. Procedural Rules Procedural requirements are introduced in the text, principally through a brief discussion of  the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (FRCP). A. S TAGES OF L ITIGATION Most cases follow the same basic steps, from the pleadings through the appeal (if any).  The text uses a hypothetical to illustrate various stages in litigation. B. T HE F IRST S TEP : C ONSULTING WITH AN A TTORNEY
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The text outlines what an attorney might tell a client about a lawsuit, including the  probability of success, and the procedures, money, and time involved.  How an attorney’s  fees may be calculated and who might be liable for them is explained.  It is also noted  that an attorney’s fees do not include other costs related to a case, such as court fees. A DDITIONAL B ACKGROUND Who Pays an Attorney’s Fee? Generally, unless statutorily or contractually authorized, attorneys’ fees are not awardable to a win- ning party.  Thus, the basic answer is that everyone pays his or her own  attorney’s fee .  There are  exceptions.   In some circumstances (for example, in certain cases involving indigent criminal defen- dants), the government pays, win or lose.  Fees may be awarded if the losing party acted in bad faith,  vexatiously, wantonly, or for oppressive reasons, or if the litigation confers a substantial benefit on the  members of an ascertainable class and the court’s subject matter jurisdiction makes possible an award to  spread the costs among them.  In a civil rights action, a court may award fees to a prevailing defendant,  if the action is interpreted as frivolous, unreasonable, or without foundation.  (Most, if not all, civil rights  laws expressly provide that attorneys’ fees may be awarded to a prevailing plaintiff.) Of course, the sources of the funds to pay attorneys’ fees vary.  Under a contingent fee arrangement,  an attorney might agree to accept as compensation a percentage—typically, about thirty to forty percent —of whatever amount is recovered.  (If nothing is recovered, the attorney receives nothing.)  Sometimes  parties not directly involved in the litigation pay.  (For example, an individual who favors prayer in the  schools might pay the defense’s expenses in an appropriate case.)  Sometimes attorneys pay their own  fees.   (Attorneys refer to this work as   pro bono .   For example, attorneys handling cases for the  American Civil Liberties Union pay their own fees.) II. Pretrial Procedures A. T HE P LEADINGS In a civil case, the pleadings inform each party of the other’s claims and specify the is- sues.  The pleadings consist of a complaint and an answer.
Background image of page 2
1.The Plaintiff’s Complaint
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 16

lecture notes ch. 3 - Chapter 3 Title:BusLawSeal.eps...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online