lecture notes ch. 8

lecture notes ch. 8 - Chapter 8 Title:BusLawSeal.eps...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 8 Intellectual Property and Internet Law
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Intellectual Property and Internet Law C HAPTER O UTLINE I. Trademarks and Related Property A   trademark   is  a  distinctive   mark,   motto,   device,   or   implement   that   a  manufacturer  stamps, prints, or otherwise affixes to the goods it produces so that they may be identified on  the market and their origin vouched for. C ASE S YNOPSIS Case 8.1: The Coca-Cola Co. v. The Koke Co. of America The Coca-Cola Co. sought to enjoin The Koke Co. of America and other beverage companies from,  among  other things,  using  the  word Koke  for  their  products.  Koke  contended  that  the  Coca-Cola  trademark was a fraudulent representation and that Coca-Cola was thus not entitled to an injunction.  Koke alleged that Coca-Cola, by its use of the Coca-Cola name, represented that the beverage contained  cocaine (from coca leaves). The court granted the injunction against Koke, but an appellate court  reversed. Coca-Cola appealed to the United States Supreme Court. The United States Supreme Court upheld the trial court’s decision. The Supreme Court acknowl- edged that before 1900 Coca-Cola’s good will was enhanced by the presence of a small amount of cocaine,  but that the cocaine had long been eliminated from the drink. The Court underscored that Coca-Cola was  not “a medicine” and that its attraction did not lay in producing “a toxic effect.” Since 1900 sales had 
Background image of page 2
increased. The name had come to characterize a well known beverage to be had almost anywhere “rather  than a compound of particular substances.” The Court noted that before this suit was brought Coca-Cola  had advertised that the public would not find cocaine in Coca-Cola. “[I]t would be going too far to deny  the plaintiff relief against a palpable fraud because possibly here and there an ignorant person might  call for the drink with the hope for incipient cocaine intoxication.” .................................................................................................................................................. Notes and Questions Until 1903, the amount of active cocaine in each bottle of Coke was equivalent to one “line” of co- caine, and, “many years before this suit was brought,” as the Supreme Court put it, Coca-Cola was ad- vertised as an “ideal nerve tonic and stimulant.”  In the first part of this century, the word Dope was  understood to mean Coke.   If a customer asked for a “Dope,” he or she was given a Coke.   Koke at- tempted to associate the word with its product, and Coca-Cola also sought to stop this, arguing that  people would be confused if they ordered a Dope, expecting a Coke, and got something else.   The  Supreme Court refused relief, concluding that Dope was not a sufficiently descriptive term.  The Court 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 52

lecture notes ch. 8 - Chapter 8 Title:BusLawSeal.eps...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online