lecture notes ch. 12

lecture notes ch. 12 - Chapter 11 Title:BusLawSeal.eps...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 11 Chapter 12 Consideration
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Restatement (Second) of Contracts, Section 71 Consideration is something exchanged for something else. Often, the concept of consideration is  broken into the two elements that are discussed above and in the text. These elements are also discussed  in the  Restatement (Second) of Contracts, Section 71 . The following is the text of that section  with selected Comments and Illustrations. § 71. Requirement of Exchange; Types of Exchange (1) To constitute consideration, a performance or a return promise must be bargained for. (2) A performance or return promise is bargained for if it is sought by the promisor in exchange for his  promise and is given by the promisee in exchange for that promise. (3) The performance may consist of (a) an act other than a promise, or (b) a forbearance, or (c) the creation, modification, or destruction of a legal relation. (4) The performance or return promise may be given to the promisor or to some other person.  It may be  given by the promisee or by some other person. Comment: *  *  *  * b.   “Bargained for.”  In the typical bargain, the consideration and the promise bear a reciprocal relation 
Background image of page 2
of motive or inducement:  the consideration induces the making of the promise and the promise induces  the furnishing of the consideration.  Here, as in the matter of mutual assent, the law is concerned with  the external manifestation rather than the undisclosed mental state:  it is enough that one party mani- fests an intention to induce the other’s response and to be induced by it and that the other responds in  accordance with the inducement.  *  *  *  But it is not enough that the promise induces the conduct of the  promisee or that the conduct of the promisee induces the making of the promise; both elements must be  present or there is no bargain.  Moreover, a mere pretense of bargain does not suffice, as where there is a  false recital of consideration or where the purported consideration is merely nominal.   In such cases  there is no consideration and the promise is enforced, if at all, as a promise binding without considera- tion *  *  * . Illustrations: l. A offers to buy a book owned by B and to pay B $10 in exchange therefore.  B accepts the offer and de- livers the book to A.  The transfer and delivery of the book constitute a performance and are considera- tion for A’s promise.  See Uniform Commercial Code §§ 2-106, 2-301.  This is so even though A at the  time he makes the offer secretly intends to pay B $10 whether or not he gets the book, or even though B  at the time he accepts secretly intends not to collect the $10.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 20

lecture notes ch. 12 - Chapter 11 Title:BusLawSeal.eps...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online