CHAUCER first translation

CHAUCER first translation - Dylan Douglas Professor Klein...

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Dylan Douglas Professor Klein Chaucer 09/09/09 The Miller The Millere was a stout carl for the nones; Ful byg he was of brawn, and eek of bones. That proved wel, for over al ther he cam, At wrestlynge he wolde have alwey the ram. He was short-sholdred, brood, a thikke knarre Ther was no dore that he nolde heve of harre, Or breke it at a rennying with his heed. His berd as any sowe or fox was reed, And therto brood, as though it were a spade. Upon the cop right of his nose he hade A werte, and theron stood a toft of herys, Reed as the brustles of a sowes erys; His nosethirles blake were and wyde. A swerd and a bokeler bar he by his side. His mouth as greet was as a greet forneys. He was a janglere and a goliardeys, And that was moost of synne and harlotries. Wel koude he stelen corn and a tollen tries; And yet he hadde a thombe of gold, pardee. A whit cote and a blew hood wered he. A baggepipe wel koude he blowe and sowne, And therwithal he broghte us out of towne. Translation:
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CHAUCER first translation - Dylan Douglas Professor Klein...

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