#5physicslabJohn

#5physicslabJohn - John McCauley and Tyler L isowski...

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John McCauley and Tyler Lisowski Coefficient of Friction Abstract: The purpose of this lab was to find the coefficients of friction using a piece of wood, a block and a pulley system. During the experiment, we found both the kinetic and static coefficients of friction. Through tests we also found out that the normal force had no significant influence on the coefficients of friction. Mass was added onto a mass hanger until the block moved at a constant velocity down the wood with the pulley to prove this idea.
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The weight of the block was varied to prove that the normal force did not matter in the value of the coefficients of friction. Purpose : This lab was performed in order to demonstrate the relationship and differences between static and kinetic coefficients of friction. The purpose of this lab was to prove that the coefficient of static friction is always greater than the coefficient of kinetic friction. Another purpose of this lab was to show that the different coefficients of friction do not rely on the normal force applied on the object. Hypothesis : The coefficient of kinetic friction will always be less than the coefficient of static friction between the same two objects. If we thoroughly investigate the coefficients of friction for the smooth wooden block against the wooden board, we will find the static friction coefficient to be greater than the kinetic coefficient of friction.
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Materials : Smooth wooden board, smooth wooden block, string, balance and calibrated masses, mass holder and slotted masses, pulley, and protractor Procedure : You must find the angle at which the block begins to naturally and uniformly accelerate down the inclined plane without any outside forces acting on the block; this is the theta of static friction. In order to accurately measure this angle, slowly and slightly raise the inclined plane carefully
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#5physicslabJohn - John McCauley and Tyler L isowski...

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