482422 final paper.docx - Surname1 Studentu2019s Name...

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Surname1 Student’s Name: Instructor’s Name: Course Code: Date: “Young Goodman Brown” Hero’s Journey Goodman Brown undertakes the hero’s journey in the story that Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote. The journey is perceived to be a usual stage of events that several writers use in stories to display the mental, physical, and emotional change the hero experiences in the entire story. The Hero's Journey uses three main parts, such as Separation, Supreme Ordeal, and Unification. Hawthorne utilizes all these stages so that he can show the absence of Goodman's innocence through loss as the character undertakes the Hero's Journey. Claim/Warrant Goodman Brown gets married to Faith, who becomes his newly wedded wife and decides to undertake a journey that the young man Goodman Brown goes into the forest during the night. Goodman tended to be innocent and perhaps seemed to have a naïve soul and was admired by the townspeople and was named "mindless fellow." During the time Goodman and his wife Faith were walking, Goodman attempts to severally look back and eventually decides to get rid of the devil. Nevertheless, Goodman Brown observes that even Faith tends to have given up to the similar evil trail that he was now on, Goodman gives up and proceeds into the forest. He then comes across witches' Sabbath, which is a place where he discovers familiar faces of individuals that he initially went to for spiritual direction; Goodman again discovers that his wife was also
Surname2 amongst them and tends to be overwhelmed by the experience. Eventually, Goodman undergoes dire experience, and, in the end, he wakes up and realizes that he is alone in the wilderness. Three main parts of Archetypal Journey The event occurred when Goodman Brown decides to go out during the night into the wilderness. It is perceived to be not clear the motivation Goodman had excepted with the sense that; his drive was for fighting or provoking the devil. There is an assumption that Goodman Brown tends to have uncertainties in his faith and tended to be curious concerning the furtive occurrence that was occurring during the night. Immediately he departs; he begins to question his decision since his wife will feel disturbed if she discovers the purpose that Goodman was planning to undertake. The woods tend to be a lifeless road, murky by the darkest trees of the woods, which were hardly next to one another so that they could allow the narrow path to be extended through it. The road that instantly closed behind the woods was perceived to be lifeless

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