Misty Charnesky--Punishment Research

Misty Charnesky--Punishment Research - Running head...

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Running head: PUNISHMENT RESEARCH 1 Punishment Research Misty Charnesky SOC-120 May 1, 2011 Pamela Strunk
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PUNISHMENT RESEARCH 2 Abstract
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PUNISHMENT RESEARCH 3 Punishment Research There are four justifications for punishment in the United States. Starting with the oldest form of justification and working our way to the most modern justifications I will talk about retribution, deterrence, rehabilitation, and social protection. Just to give an idea of what these terms mean retribution is an act of moral vengeance by which society makes the offender suffer as much as the suffering caused by the crime. Deterrence is an attempt to discourage criminality through the use of punishment. Rehabilitation includes a program for reforming the offender to prevent later offenses. Lastly, societal protection is rendering an offender incapable of further offenses temporarily through imprisonment or permanently by execution. (Deviance Chapter 7) I found an article in the Phoenix Library on the “Retribution and the Experience of Punishment” of the California law. Reading through the article gives a whole new insight on Capital Punishment and the meaning of retribution. Going by the information provided I get an idea that this form of punishment does not work. The gist of the article relies on the view of the person receiving the punishment itself. Some individuals may experience more negative effects from a two year sentence in prison than a one year sentence, where as another person may not see a significant difference in the negative effect involved. Giving more time for worse crimes is not always the solution to stop the offense from happening again. For some, the experience could be beneficial the first time around, causing him or her to not do the action originally occurred again, even to become a more model citizen. In other cases people have been known to become “institutionalized” from a prison experience making this form of punishment ineffective. A person’s view on an experience is the key to this punishment and unless the person can
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Misty Charnesky--Punishment Research - Running head...

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