Stat20HW - STAT 20 HW 1 Q7: An introduction to continuous...

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STAT 20 HW 1 Q7: An introduction to continuous random variables. The Prelude : When dealing with a variable like the “number of children who live in 60 houses on a street” or “the number of cars parked at each of the 60 houses” we deal with counts that have possible values 0, 1, 2,… These are both examples of Discrete Variables. The actual list of the number of children who live in the houses might be: 2, 0, 3, 4, 0, 1, 0 etc. A histogram could be produced for such a list and is a pictorial representation of the list. Remember that the total area under the histogram is 100% and the area of each rectangle in the histogram is equal to the % of numbers in the list that lie within the base of the interval. However not all variables are discrete, we may have to deal with “Continuous Random Variables” like time (for example: the life length of some electrical component) or the volume of water flowing into a dam over a 24 hour period etc. The histogram needed for such variables will be a smooth curve. In order to create the histogram we
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Stat20HW - STAT 20 HW 1 Q7: An introduction to continuous...

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