{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Math_course_manual - Nursing Math Presented by NURSING EDGE...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Nursing Math Presented by NURSING EDGE 1
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Course Schedule________________________ Day One 1. Multiplying Fractions with Units 2. Common Conversions 3. Converting Temperatures 4. Pills 5. Suspensions 6. Tube Feedings 7. Weight based Calculations 8. Pediatric Fluid Requirement 9. Medications in a Vial Day Two 10. IV: Push Medications 11. IV: Drop Factor 12. IV: Fluids/Medications via Pump 13. IV: Units or ml per Hour 14. IV: Critical Care Math 2
Image of page 2
1. Multiplying Fractions with Units The basis of all nursing math is multiplying fractions with units. The process: 1. Determine the starting factor (what you know) 2. Determine the unit answer (the unit of measurement of the desired answer) 3. Determine a bridge factor (what will take you from the starting factor to the unit answer) 4. Formulate a conversion equation Starting factor X bridge factor = unit answer 5. Solve the equation a. Multiply top numbers b. Multiply bottom numbers c. Divide 6. Determine if the answer makes sense Example: Mr. Smith is ordered 500 mg Drug X. On hand is 250 mg tablets. How many tablets should the nurse administer? Step 1: Determine the starting factor (what is known) We know that Mr. Smith needs 500 mg Drug X. 500 mg is the starting factor. Step 2: Determine the unit answer The unit answer must be in mg Step 3: Determine a bridge factor 1 tablet 250 mg Step 4: Formulate a conversion equation 500 mg X 1 tablet = ____ mg 250 mg Step 5: Solve the equation (500 mg X 1 tablet)/250 mg = 2 tablets Step 6: Determine if the answer makes sense It is reasonable to administer 2 tablets to a patient 3
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
A. Practice Problems 1. 10 ml X 20 mg = ___mg 5 ml 2. 46 mg X 30 ml = __ ml 10 mg 3. 17 ml X 15 mg = __ mg 5 ml B. Homework Problems 1. 19 ml X 40 mg = ___mg 15 ml 2. 52 mg X 25 ml = __ ml 20 mg 3. 5 mg X 2 ml = __ ml 0.5 mg 4. 120 ml X 40 mg = ___mg 60 ml 5. 15 ml X 0.1 mg = ___mg 7.5 ml 2. Common Conversions Conversions can be used as bridge factors. Example: Ms. Jones drank 4 glasses of water on day shift. How many ounces should the nurse record on the day sheet? Starting Factor: 4 glasses Unit Answer: ounces Bridge Factor: 1 glass contains 8 ounces 4 glasses X 8 ounces = 32 ounces 1 glass 4
Image of page 4
1 cental = 45,359 grams (g) 1 centimeter (cm) = 10 millimeters (mm) 1 cubic centimeter (cc) = 1 milliliter (ml) 1 cup (c) = 8 ounces (oz) 1 drachm = 3.55 milliliter (ml) 1 dram (dr) = 60 grains (gr) 1 dram (fl dr) = 60 minims 1 gallon (gal) = 4 quarts (qt) 1 gill = 4 ounces (oz) 1 glass = 8 ounces (oz) 1 grain (gr) = 64.8 milligrams (mg) 1 gram (g) = 1,000 milligrams (mg) 1 gram (g) = 1,000,000 micrograms (mcg) 1 gram (g) = 15.43 grains (gr) 1 hand = 4 inches (in) 1 inch (in) = 2.54 centimeters (cm) 1 kilogram (kg) = 1,000 grams (g) 1 kilogram (kg) = 2.2 pounds (lb) 1 liter (L) = 1000 milliliters (ml) 1 liter (L) = 1.057 quarts (qt) 1 meter (m) = 1,000 millimeters (mm) 1 meter (m) = 100 centimeters (cm) 1 milligram (mg) = 1,000 micrograms (mcg) 1 milliliter (ml) = 1 cubic centimeter (cc) 1 milliliter (ml) = 15 drops (gt) 1 milliliter (ml) = 16.23 minims 1 minim = 1 drop (gt) 1 ounce (fl oz) = 2 tablespoons (tbsp) 1 ounce (oz) = 20 pennyweights (dwt) 1 ounce (oz) = 24 scruples 1 ounce (oz) = 31.1 grams (g) 1 ounce (oz) = 480 grains (gr) 1 ounce (oz) = 8 drams (dr) 1 ounce, fluid (fl oz) = 29.57 milliliters (ml) 1 palm = 3 inches (in) 1 pennyweight (dwt) = 24 grains (gr) 1 pint (pt) = 16 ounces (oz) 1 pint (pt) = 4 gills 1 pound (lb) = 16 ounces (oz) 1 pound (lb) = 350 scruples 1 quart (qt) = 0.946 liters (L)
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern