Transcript_ America In the 20th Century_ America Becomes a World Power

Transcript_ America In the 20th Century_ America Becomes a World Power

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Unformatted text preview: Transcript America In the 20th Century: America Becomes a World Power , in America In the 20th Century (Media Rich Learning), 29:22 mins transcript DISCOVER your gateway to a NEW WORLD of LEARNING MEDIA RICH LEARNING www.MediaRichLearning.com NARRATOR1865. TheUnited States had just concluded the devastating Civil War. By the dawn of the20th century America will become a World Power. But first thegroundwork had to be laid. Industrialization exploded, ushering in a period ofconfidence and optimism that would define the American character.U.S. territories spilled out into the Caribbean and Pacific in a burst ofexpansionism forcing the U.S. to grapple with its new role as an imperialpower. A course that would define Americain the 20th Century. progress challenge war peace AMERICA in the 20th CENTURY America Becomes a World Power EXPANSIONISM NARRATOREuropean nation had long established imperialcolonies. The British in India, the French in Indochina. TheSpanish in the Pacific and the Caribbean. In the 19th century,they turned their attention to Africa - carving it up. Eventually, onlyLiberia and Ethiopia were left us independent countries. Russiahad even crossed the Bering Strait and established the foothold on the North American continent.It was in this competitive climate that the United States found itself...There were citizens who believed that if the U.S. did not join the land rush,it would lose out. What was the interest in expansion? Therewere three reasons: The most important was economic.During the Civil War, the U.S. had greatly increased its production of manufacturedproducts, dictating a desire to find new markets abroad and a need formore raw materials. The second reason was military strength. Somebelieved that if the U.S. lacked powerful armed forces it would not be able todefend its economic interests. The third reason was the belief in the racialsuperiority of Anglo- Saxons, white people of English descent, especiallythe British and their American cousins. In the late 1800's,many British and Americans believed it was the "white race's" God-given duty to civilizeand Christianize the so-called "inferior" peoples of the world.British writer Rudyard Kipling's poem "The White Man's Burden" appeared in McClure'sMagazine, romaticizing this idea. Rudyard Kipling Rudyard Kipling Take up the White Man's burden-Send forth the best ye breed- Go, bind your sons toexile, To serve you captives' need; To wait in heavy harness on flutteredfolk and wild, Your new- caught sullen peoples, Half devil andhalf child Samuel Gompers Grover Cleveland Booker T. Washington Andrew Carnegie Jane Addams NARRATOR The expansionist philosophy was far fromuniversal. A group of educators, writers and social activist, who called themselves"Anti-imperialist," opposed expansion. They believed that imperialismwas a threat to the American value system. That a democracy should not keep othercountries in servitude. Activist Jane Addams castigated Kipling....
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Transcript_ America In the 20th Century_ America Becomes a World Power

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