ENC_1102Fall2011 - ENC 1102 Rhetoric and Academic Research...

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Unformatted text preview: ENC 1102: Rhetoric and Academic Research MWF, period 4 (10:40a-11:30a), McCarty Hall A, Room 1142 Section: 1730 Instructor: Todd Jurgess Email: [email protected] Office: Tigert 301 Office Hours: Wednesdays, periods 5 and 6 (11:45a-1:40p) or by appointment---------------------------------------------------------------------- Course Description ENC 1102: Rhetoric and Academic Research is a course designed to help you make academic arguments in a clear and professional manner. Particularly, this course works toward a mastery of argumentative, thesis-driven writing based on academic research. You will learn how to formulate a coherent and appealing thesis, which you will then prove or defend with evidence drawn from research acknowledged as academic in your given field. Learning how to write academically according to the demands of a discipline is the vital requirement made of you as an undergraduate writer, and it is this course’s intention to help you reach those demands as they apply to all stages of the writing process, from researching and outlining to writing and revising. Further, we will explore various modalities of rhetoric (written, visual, otherwise), but will do so within the context of ethics. What constitutes ethical behavior? This answer will not be the same for everyone, but will serve as a guiding question for our course. Writing never merely acts as a conduit to transmit knowledge. The way we write often modifies, expands, or otherwise alters what we hope to say, and one of the goals of the class is to attempt to understand how different genres of writing and methods of argumentation reflect a certain ethical stance. Class discussions will reveal the complementary relationship between writing and research to demonstrate how persuasive techniques and genres vary from discipline to discipline. In the end, the course’s overall goal is to both instill you with confidence as a writer as you continue to engulf yourself in a discipline but also to help you understand how you position yourself vis-à-vis the world by way of ethics. A Word on the Course’s Structure The first unit of the course will be dedicated toward understanding how rhetoric functions in academic literature. Here, you will learn to summarize and analyze argumentative writing to both enhance your own reading skills and also to find models for the types of writing you will eventually do. From there, we will learn to research and to work closely with sources as we move finally toward synthesizing that research and presenting it in the form of an argumentative research paper. Along the way, we will learn how to use our libraries to do research, how to document our sources, and how to avoid the ghastly offense of plagiarism. To a certain extent, these skills transcend disciplinary writing and will serve you in your future writing situations almost regardless of context. Here though, we will apply them thoroughly to the demands of your own research and interests in order to step toward the...
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ENC_1102Fall2011 - ENC 1102 Rhetoric and Academic Research...

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