0 Introduction to Flight EAS 4101 S11

0 Introduction to Flight EAS 4101 S11 - EAS 4101, S11...

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EAS 4101, S11 University of Florida Use Only 1/5/11 1/8 Section 0, Introduction to Flight 0 Principles of Flight 0.1 Anatomy of the Airplane 0.1.1 Axes of Rotation Aircraft rotational motion is in three dimensional space. The aircraft will rotate about three imaginary axes that intersect at the center of gravity at right angles to each other. http://virtualskies.arc.nasa.gov/aeronautics/tutorial/motion.html
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EAS 4101, S11 University of Florida Use Only 1/5/11 2/8 Section 0, Introduction to Flight The longitudinal axis runs through the fuselage from the tail to the nose. o Motion about this axis is called roll and is produced by the deflection of the ailerons. The vertical axis runs vertically through the center of gravity. o Motion about this axis is called yaw and is produced by the deflection of the rudder. The lateral axis runs from wingtip to wingtip through the center of gravity. o Motion about this axis is called pitch and is produced by the deflection of the elevator. 0.1.2 Control Surfaces Control surfaces are the moving parts of an airplane that adjust it flight path. The three primary flight controls are the ailerons, elevator and rudder. o There are other flight control surfaces such as flaps, slots, slats and trim tabs that improve the flight control and stability of the aircraft. Ailerons Usually located on the outer trailing edge of each wing. Always move in opposite direction Responsible for rolling the airplane about the longitudinal axis Elevator Always move in the same direction. Responsible for pitching the airplane about the lateral axis Rudder Responsible for yawing the airplane about the vertical axis.
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EAS 4101, S11 University of Florida Use Only 1/5/11 3/8 Section 0, Introduction to Flight 0.2 The Four Forces in Flight An airplane in flight will have four forces (or two pairs of forces) acting on it at all times. Whenever an airplane is flying at a constant airspeed along a steady flight path, it is in static flight conditions and the opposing forces on the airplane are balanced. o Are the opposing forces on an airplane balanced if it is in a constant 200 feet per minute climb/descent? Why or why not? 0.2.1 Lift
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0 Introduction to Flight EAS 4101 S11 - EAS 4101, S11...

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