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hw7_sol - 15.2 The points can be ordered so that they are...

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Unformatted text preview: 15.2 The points can be ordered so that they are close to and centered around the lull-(noun. A divided-difference table can then be developed as x for} First Second Third Fourth 3 5.25 T25 2 [1.25 {I 5 1925 5.25 2.?5 0.25 2 4 B 1.?5 6 35 6.25 ‘l 4.?5 Note that the fact that the founh divided difference is. zero means that the data was. generated with a third-order polynomial. First order: I; [—1) = 5.25 + T.25(4— 5) =12.5 fzt4j=115 + [:4 — 5)(4 — 5E =1D.5 Third older: f3 (4) = “3.5 + [4—3)(4 — 5}(4— 30.25 =10 Fourth order: f3(4}=10.5 + (—1— 3)[—1— 5)(4 — 2}(4 — 6}D=1{) 15.3 Lagrange polynomial. First order: 4—5 4—3 4 =—5.25+ 19.?5=12.5 fl( ) 3—5 5—3 Second order: f3 {4:}:ng35 +W19I75 +W4=105 ' T3 - 5X3 — 3) (5 - 3H5 — 3) (- - 3X2 - 5) Third order: = [4—5}(4—2)[4—6} 525+ (4—3}(4—2}(4—6}19ITS (3—5)t3—2)<3—6)' (S—BHS—EDCS—fi) ' . (Lam—53mm“ (4-3)(4-5}(4-2} (2—3)t2—5)(-—6) (mars—5x64) 15.5 MATLAB can be used To generate a cubic polynomial Through The first 4 points in the Table. f3 (4} 36:10 3*} X = [l 2 3 ‘9]; 3*} fx = [3.6 1.8 1.2 0.9]; 3*} p = polyfitllxr fx,3} p : -U.15C'U 1.5000 —5.25C'0 7.5000 Therefore. The roots problem to be solved is 1.6 =—a.15x3+1.5x3—5.25x + as 01‘ f(.r} = —a.15x3+1.5x3—5.25x + 5.9 = a Biseetion can be employed the root of This polynomial. Using initial guesses ofx: = .. and In = 3. a value of 2.2156 is obtained with £3 = 0.0006991} after 16 iterations. 15.7 (:1) Because they bracket the tuilqtown. the two last points are used for linear interpolation. .? — .5 5 flail18)=5.5453+M(0.113—a11144)=5.643t 0.1254T—0.lll44 (b) The quadratic interpolation can be implemented easily in MATLAB. >> v = [0.103?7 0.1144 0.1254T]; >> s = [6.414? 6.5453 6.166%]; 5) p = polyfit{v,s,2} p: 354.2358 —Eé.99?6 9.3450 ?} polyvalip,0.ll$) ans = 6.601? Therefore. to the level of significance reported in the table the estimated entropy is 6.6077 (c) The inverse interpolation can be implemented in MATLAB. First. as in part u—‘e can fit a quadratic polynomial to the data to yield. P [-0 H [H 4.2353 -6é.99?€ 9.3450 “We must therefore find the root of 6.45 = 354.2358):2 — 64.9976x + 9.3450 or 6.45 = 354.2358):2 — 54.99%] + 2.8950 In hiATLAB. we can generate this polynomial by subtracting 6.45 from the constant coefficient of the polynomial >5 p(3)=p(3)—6.1’:5 [3 LL'I || til 4.2358 —Eé.99?6 2.- ro 'sD in CI Then. we can use the roots function to determine the solution. >> root5{p] ans = 0.1074 0.0761 Thus. the value of the specific volume corresponding to an entropy of 6.45 is 0.1074 15.10 Errata: In the first printing, the problem statement asked for a fifth—order interpolating polynomial which cannot be obtained with the 5 given points. Subsequent printings only ask for third—order and fourth-order polynomials. Third-order case: The MATLAB polyfit function can be used to generate the cubic polynomial and perform the interpolation. }} x = [1.8 2 2.2 2.4]; }} J = [0.5615 0.5?67 0 5560 0 520:], >> p = polyfit{x,J,3} p = 0.016? —0.2988 0 9306 —0.2229 }} Jpred=polyval(p,2.1} Jpred = 0.5683 The built-in function besselj can be employed to determine the true value which can then be used to determine the percent relative error >> Jtrue=besselj(1,2.1} Jtrue = 0.5683 }} ea=ab5i(Ctrue—Jpred}thrue]*100 a = 3.15T39—004 L'D Fourth-order case: >> x = [1.3 2 2.2 2 4 2.6], >> J = 0.5815 0.5?67 0.5560 0.520: 0.4?08]; }} p = polyfit{x,J,4} p = 0.0182 —0.1365 0.1818 0.2630 0.123? >> Jpred=polyval{p,2.1} Jpred = 0.5683 >> ea=abat(Ctrue—Jpred}thrue]*100 ea = 0.0021 16.1 (a) The simultaneous equations for the natural spline can be set up as 1 cl' 0 ' 1 3 0.5. 1:2 0 0.5 2 0.5 c3, _ —6 0.5 3 1 c4 _ —24 1 4 1 ('5 1s 1 es 0 These equations can be solved for the (3‘s and then Eqs. (16.21) and (16.13) can be used to solve for the [1's and the d‘s. The coefficients for the intervals can be summarized as interval a b C d 1 1 3.9T9954 9 9.829948 2 5 4.858991 8.88713? 8.48884 3 T 3.849249 -8.52282 43.31535 4 8 —1.41989 -9.99585 5.414938 5 2 —5.‘|8598 8.248983 2.88299 These can be used to generate the following plot of the natural spline: DIN-B01030 Notice how the not-a-knot version exhibits much more curvature. partielflafly between the laat points. [13) The piecewiae eubie Hermite polynomial and ita plot can be generated with MATLAB as 3>) X [l C 4 5]; 3;; y [l E 1]; >> xx = linspacefll,5}: >> yy = interpl {erJXXr 'E'ChiF'JF >3: plc-t{x,y, 'C'TrxerY} -..J b.) m in l' 3 LL! 16.3 (a) The llflt-fl-kllOT fit can be r:.e’r up in MfiJ'LAB as >? x = linspace{fl,l,ll}; >> y = l.f{[x—O.3].“C+O.Ulj+l.f{[x—D.9).“C+U.04}—E; >> xx = linapaceifl,l}; >§ yy 5p1ine{x,y,xx}: >> yh l.f[[xx—0.3).“Z+U.Dl}+1.ffi{xx—D.9}.A2+D.Oé]—E; >§ plct{x,y,'c*,xx,yg,xx,yh,T——'j 10D ED ED 40 20 D fl.2 0.4- 0.6 (LEI 1 (b) The piecewise cubic Hermite polynomial fit can be rget up in [VIATLAB as >> = linspace{fl,l,ll}; >> — l.f{[x—O.3].“C+O.Ulj+l.f{[x—O.9).“C+U.Dé}—E; >§ XX = linspace(fl,l}: >> yy = interpl{x,y,xx,'pchip']; >} yh = l.f[[xx—0.3).“:+U.Dl}+1.f[{xx—D.9}.*:+D.Dé]-E; >> plct{x,y,'GT,xx,yy,Xx,yh,T——'j H1 N | 16.5 (a) The llot-a-kno‘r fit can be SET up in NIATLAB as D? x = [-1 -D.E -U.2 0.2 0.6 1]; >:»y=[000111]: >> xx = linspacei—l,l}: >) yy 2 spline§xryJXX}F >> 1::1C-‘t:{:>s‘..r y, 'c-T . xx; YE} 12 1 DE DE- 04- 31 -05 D D5 1 (b) The clamped spline with zero end alopea can be set up in MQLTLAB as >§ x = [—1 —D.E —U.2 0.2 0.6 1]; >> y = [O U D l l l]: >§ ya = [U y D]; }} xx = linspacei—l,l}: }} yy = 5pline{x,ys,xx}; >> E'lc-t {Kr Y: '6‘ .XX: FY} 12 11 —D5 U 05 1 {e} The piecewise eubie Hermite polynomial fit can he get up in NIATLAB as 3} x = [—1 —D.6 —u.2 0-2 0.6 1]; 3} y = [e a D l 1 i]: §§ xx = linspacei-l:1}F }} yy = interpl{er;KKr'PChiF'}F >3 plct{xry:'GT:XX:YY} 16.10 (:1) Here is a MATLAB seaaion to develop The 5p1i11e and plot it along with The dam: >> x=[D C 4 T 1012]; >> y=[20 El] 12 “J 'E- E]; >3> xx=linspace{0,12): >> yy=splinetx,y,xxj; >3> ple-t{x,y, 'c-T,xx,yy}l 25 ‘15 1C! Here is the command to make the prediction: >> yp=splinetx,y,1.5} (b) To prescribe zero first derivatives at the end knots. the y vector is modified so that the first and last elements are set to the desired values of zero. The plot and the prediction both indicate that there is less overshoot between the first two points because of the prescribed zero slopes. )} yd=[0 y D]; }) yy=splinetx,yd,xx}; >3 plottmy; 'c-HXXIYY} >> yy=splinetx,yd,l.5} 20.5?01 ...
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