The Principle of the Indiscernibility of Identicals

The Principle of the Indiscernibility of Identicals - Says...

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The Principle of the Indiscernibility of Identicals: States that if two objects are one and the same object, then every feature, characteristic, and property of one of the objects are also a feature, characteristic, and property of the other object. This principle also states that identical objects are completely similar and an object must be completely similar to itself. The overall idea of this principle is that when two objects are identical every instance of both objects is identical as well, because all identical objects are completely similar to each other and themselves. The Principle of the Identity of Indiscernibles:
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Unformatted text preview: Says that if one object has the same features, properties, and characteristics as another, then the two objects are on in the same. This principle would seem to be the opposite of the previous mentioned principle in my answer to number 4. The principle of the Identity of Indiscernibles is a very controversial principle because it says that no two objects can be completely similar. The principle instead states that if every instance of one object is also the instance of another object, then they are the exact same object rather than two distinct objects....
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This note was uploaded on 09/02/2011 for the course PHI 1000 taught by Professor Staff during the Winter '10 term at Wayne State University.

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