2008BFreeResponse

2008BFreeResponse - AP® United States History 2008...

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Unformatted text preview: AP® United States History 2008 Free-Response Questions Form B The College Board: Connecting Students to College Success The College Board is a not-for-profit membership association whose mission is to connect students to college success and opportunity. Founded in 1900, the association is composed of more than 5,000 schools, colleges, universities, and other educational organizations. Each year, the College Board serves seven million students and their parents, 23,000 high schools, and 3,500 colleges through major programs and services in college admissions, guidance, assessment, financial aid, enrollment, and teaching and learning. Among its best-known programs are the SAT®, the PSAT/NMSQT®, and the Advanced Placement Program® (AP®). The College Board is committed to the principles of excellence and equity, and that commitment is embodied in all of its programs, services, activities, and concerns. © 2008 The College Board. All rights reserved. College Board, Advanced Placement Program, AP, AP Central, SAT, and the acorn logo are registered trademarks of the College Board. PSAT/NMSQT is a registered trademark of the College Board and National Merit Scholarship Corporation. Permission to use copyrighted College Board materials may be requested online at: www.collegeboard.com/inquiry/cbpermit.html. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. AP Central is the official online home for the AP Program: apcentral.collegeboard.com. 2008 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) UNITED STATES HISTORY SECTION II Part A (Suggested writing time—45 minutes) Percent of Section II score—45 Directions: The following question requires you to construct a coherent essay that integrates your interpretation of Documents A-H and your knowledge of the period referred to in the question. High scores will be earned only by essays that both cite key pieces of evidence from the documents and draw on outside knowledge of the period. 1. For the years 1880 to 1925, analyze both the tensions surrounding the issue of immigration and the United States government’s response to these tensions. Use the following documents and your knowledge of the period from 1880 to 1925 to construct your answer. Document A Source: Puck magazine, April 28, 1880 Reproduced by permission of Punch Ltd. © 2008 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. -2- 2008 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) Document B Source: James Bryce, The American Commonwealth, 1888 A certain part of this recent immigration is transitory. Italians and Slovaks, for instance, after they have by thrift accumulated a sum which is large for them, return to their native villages, and carry back with them new notions and habits which set up a ferment among the simple rustics of a Calabrian or North Hungarian Valley. For the United States the practice has the double advantage of supplying a volume of cheap unskilled labour when employment is brisk and of removing it when employment becomes slack, so that the number of the unemployed, often very large when a financial crisis has brought bad times, is rapidly reduced, and there is more work for the permanently settled part of the laboring class. It is the easier to go backwards and forwards, because two thirds among all the races except the Jews, are men, either unmarried youths or persons who have left their wives behind. Document C Source: National People’s Party platform, 1892, Expression of Sentiments Resolved, That we condemn the fallacy of protecting American labor under the present system, which opens our ports to the pauper and criminal classes of the world and crowds out our wage-earners; and we denounce the present ineffective laws against contract labor, and demand the further restriction of undesirable emigration. © 2008 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. -3- 2008 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) Document D Source: Booker T. Washington, speech in Atlanta, Georgia, September 18, 1895 To those of the white race who look to the incoming of those of foreign birth and strange tongue and habits for the prosperity of the South, were I permitted I would repeat what I say to my own race, “Cast down your bucket where you are.” Cast it down among the eight millions of Negroes whose habits you know, whose fidelity and love you have tested in days when to have proved treacherous meant the ruin of your firesides. Cast down your bucket among these people who have without strikes and labour wars, tilled your fields, cleared your forest, [built] your railroads and cities, and brought forth treasures from the bowels of the earth, and helped make possible this magnificent representation of the progress of the South . . . . As we have proved our loyalty to you in the past, . . . we shall stand by you with a devotion that no foreigner can approach . . . . Document E Source: Report of the Commissioner General of Immigration, 1908 In order that the best results might follow from an enforcement of the regulations, an understanding was reached with Japan that the existing policy of discouraging emigration of its subjects of the laboring classes to continental United States should continue, and should, by co-operation with the governments, be made as effective as possible. © 2008 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. -4- 2008 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) Document F Source: Edward A. Ross, Century Magazine, 1914 In 1908, on the occasion of a “homecoming” celebration in Boston, a newspaper told how the returning sons of Boston were “greeted by Mayor Fitzgerald and the following members of Congress: O’Connell, Kelihar, Sullivan, and McNary—following in the footsteps of Webster, Sumner, Adams, and Hoar. They were told of the great work as Mayor of the late beloved Patrick Collins. At the City Hall they found the sons of Irish exiles and immigrants administering the affairs of the metropolis of New England. Besides the Mayor, they were greeted by John J. Murphy, Chairman of the Board of Assessors; Commissioner of Streets Doyle; Commissioner of Baths O’Brien . . . Police Commissioner O’Meara.” Document G Source: Madison Grant, The Passing of the Great Race, 1918 Whatever may be its intellectual, its literary, its artistic or its musical aptitudes, as compared with other races, the Anglo-Saxon branch of the Nordic race is again showing itself to be that upon which the nation must chiefly depend for leadership, for courage, for loyalty, for unity and harmony of action, for self-sacrifice and devotion to an ideal. Not that members of other races are not doing their part, many of them are, but in no other human stock which has come to this country is there displayed the unanimity of heart, mind and action which is now being displayed by the descendants of the blue-eyed, fair-haired peoples of the north of Europe. © 2008 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. -5- 2008 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) Document H Source: The Literary Digest, May 7, 1921 Library of Congress END OF DOCUMENTS FOR QUESTION 1 © 2008 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. -6- 2008 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) UNITED STATES HISTORY SECTION II Part B and Part C (Suggested total planning and writing time—70 minutes) Percent of Section II score—55 Part B Directions: Choose ONE question from this part. You are advised to spend 5 minutes planning and 30 minutes writing your answer. Cite relevant historical evidence in support of your generalizations and present your arguments clearly and logically. 2. Analyze the reasons for the Anti-Federalists’ opposition to ratifying the Constitution. 3. Use TWO of the following categories to analyze the ways in which African Americans created a distinctive culture in slavery. Family Music Oral traditions Religions © 2008 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. -7- 2008 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) Part C Directions: Choose ONE question from this part. You are advised to spend 5 minutes planning and 30 minutes writing your answer. Cite relevant historical evidence in support of your generalizations and present your arguments clearly and logically. 4. Analyze the extent to which the Spanish-American War was a turning point in American foreign policy. 5. Analyze the extent to which the 1920s and 1950s were similar in TWO of the following areas. Impact of technology Intolerant attitudes Literary developments STOP END OF EXAM © 2008 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). -8- ...
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This note was uploaded on 09/06/2011 for the course HISTORY 21 taught by Professor Alexander during the Spring '11 term at UCLA.

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