E.0.6 - 50x0.19635mm^2=9.81748 Since both are supporting equal weight we can set the breaking force of the 50 wires equal to the breaking force of

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Diameter is proportional to the cube root of the volume. Sun's volume is 1 million times that of Earth's. Therefore, Sun's diameter is 1,000,000^(1/3) = 100 times that of Earth's. Thus, the diameter of the Sun is about 100x13,000km=1,300,000km. If width is 'w' and length is 'l', then area or amount of ink used for original size is l x w=lw. For doubled size type you double length and width, 2xl=2l and 2xw=2w. The area is then 2l x 2w = 4lw. You find the scale factor by dividing the doubled size type by original size type, 4lw/lw=4. Your scale factor for area is 4 so you need four times as much ink as before. Breaking force is proportional to N x cross-sectional area of one wire or total cross sectional area of N wires. There are 50 wires with area of (.5/2)^2 x pi = 0.19635mm^2, so breaking force is proportional to
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Unformatted text preview: 50x0.19635mm^2=9.81748. Since both are supporting equal weight, we can set the breaking force of the 50 wires equal to the breaking force of the 1 wire, 9.81748=1x(z/2)^2 x pi. We solve for z, or the diameter, and get -3.536 and 3.536. Since our measurement can't be negative, the diameter of the single steel wire is 3.536mm. The length of the snake is equal to eight worms laid end to end. The cross sectional area of the snake is eight worms laid side-by-side divided by two, squared, and then multiplied by pi - (8 worms/2)^2 x pi = 16pi. If we multiply the cross sectional area by the length, which is 8 worms laid end to end, then we get the volume of the snake in the measurement of worms, 16pi x 8 = 402.124 worms. The snake would have to eat 402.124 worms to double its weight....
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This note was uploaded on 09/07/2011 for the course PHYSICS 101 taught by Professor Graham during the Spring '11 term at UNC.

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