Lecture29 - Elements of Cable-stayed

Lecture29 - Elements of Cable-stayed - Lecture # 29...

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Lecture # 29 Elements of Cable-Stayed Bridges
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cables pylon pier girder foundation abutment adjacent pier
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The Tampa Skyway Bridge in 1984. The main span is 400 m. pylon cables pier girder adjacent pier foundation
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Dr. Santiago Calatrava’s Alamillo Bridge in Sevilla. Note the 13 pairs of harp cables.
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The equilibrium of the forces does not develop bending moments at the bottom of the pylon.
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The moment at the base of the pylon for the Alamillo Bridge.
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The Cables
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radial harp fan star Cable arrangements for multi-spans Two-span
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G – cable weight a = inclination angle (0.4 = tan a = 0.50) cable tension
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The cables are inclined, and therefore the actual (effective) stiffness EA is a function of their nominal stiffness EA, through a relation proposed by Tang (1), 22 2 () cos 1 12 EA EA effective G E Aa T =  +   Most cables are stresses to about 40% of their ultimate strengths under permanent load conditions. Cables under normal loading conditions have their effective stiffness approach the actual stiffness. A factor of safety of 2.2 is common for cables, which results in an allowable stress of 45% of the guaranteed ultimate tensile stress (GUTS) under dead and live loads. Note that the weakest point of a cable is its anchorage with respect to capacity and fatigue.
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Lecture29 - Elements of Cable-stayed - Lecture # 29...

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