{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

12-Triaxial-Test

12-Triaxial-Test - d-Undr ained Tr iaxial Compr ession Test...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 σ 1 σ 3 σ 3 σ ed-Undrained Triaxial Compression Test on Cohesive Soils ined) Plateau due to consolidatino Florida International University Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering CEG 4011 L Geotechnical Engineering I Laboratory Dr. Luis A. Prieto-Portar PhD, PE, SE. Lab Report #12 The Triaxial-Test Undrained (ASTM D-3080) Performed on July 2010 Team Members: Member Attendance Writing Assignment Completed
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Summary
Background image of page 2
A. INTRODUCTION This notice deals with Undrainest triaxial test (U) also called an Unconsolidated-Undrained test (UU).  It’s a common method to measure the mechanical properties of many deformable solids, especially  soil sand clay , and other  granular materials  or  powders . A solid is defined as a material that can support shear stress without moving. However, every solid  has an upper limit to how much shear stress it can support. The triaxial tester is designed to measure that  limit. The stress on the platens is increased until the material in the cylinder fails and forms sliding regions  within itself, known as  shear bands . A motion where a material is deformed under shear stress is known  as   shearing.   The geometry of the shearing in a triaxial tester typically causes the sample to become  shorter while bulging out along the sides. The stress on the platen is then reduced and the water pressure  pushes the sides back in, causing the sample to grow taller again. This cycle is usually  repeated several   times  while collecting stress and strain data about the sample. From the triaxial test data, it is possible to extract fundamental material parameters about the sample,  including its angle of shearing resistance, apparent cohesion, and dilatancy angle. These parameters are  then used in computer models to predict how the material will behave in a larger-scale engineering  application. An example would be to predict the stability of the soil on a slope, whether the slope will  collapse or whether the soil will support the shear stresses of the slope and remain in place. Triaxial tests  are used along with other tests to make such engineering predictions The principle behind a triaxial test is that the stress applied in the vertical direction (along the axis of  the cylinder) can be different than the stress applied in the horizontal directions (along the sides of the  cylinder). This produces a non-hydrostatic stress state, which contains shear stress.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}