{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Slides for Exam 2

Slides for Exam 2 - At-will employment in the U.S Replaced...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
At-will employment in the U.S. Replaced common law based on English practices, where: o One year term implied o Good cause required for termination 1877 - American courts adopted at-will doctrine o Judge-made law o Employees can be fired at will of employer, for no cause 1960s reforms o Federal anti-discrimination laws o Courts began to recognize public policy exceptions U.S. is the only at-will industrialized nation
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
At-will doctrine exceptions: Federal statutes: Civil Rights Act of 1964 - Employees cannot be fired on basis of race, gender, national origin, religious beliefs, age (over 40), or disability (added in 1990). NLRA - Workers can’t be fired for union organizing activities. WARN – Requires 60 days notice of large-scale layoffs.
Background image of page 2
At-will doctrine exceptions: Common law (and some state statutes): Public Policy - Employees cannot be fired for complying with laws or exercising legal rights. Implied Contract - Employees cannot be fired if they were led to believe their jobs were secure.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}