Notes from Riggsby’s Caesar in Gaul and Rome

Notes from Riggsby’s Caesar in Gaul and...

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Notes from Riggsby’s Caesar in Gaul and Rome “My discussion of the relationship between tactical space and centuriation suggested that Caesar’s division of Gaul implies that the land is available, that he recalls a context in which ownership is either disputed or nonexistent. Of course, he says nothing of the sort explicitly, nor does he make any overt arguments about ownership. Rather, he exploits the reader’s unfamiliarity with the territory. He does not, at the fine scale, illustrate a pattern of Gallic ownership, then narrate its seizure by the Romans. Each bit of land is introduced only as it is contested. Slanting the narrative this way is of a piece with the justifications for war interwoven in the narrative, described below in Chapter 6. Many scholars believe that Romans found successful military conquest self-justifying. The fact that Caesar spins his narrative so as to legitimate it argues to the contrary. Or, more precisely, the self-justification of conquest takes place only in the context of a worldview that presupposes the notions of justice, responsibility,
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This note was uploaded on 09/07/2011 for the course HIST 208M taught by Professor Burghart during the Spring '11 term at Maryland.

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Notes from Riggsby’s Caesar in Gaul and...

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