Dec 6 immigration

Dec 6 immigration - Immigration 1 Why to individuals...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Immigration 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Why to individuals migrate out of home country? Evolution of US population and immigration policy How do immigrants perform in host country? Impact of immigrants on natives? Best immigration policy for host country? 2
Background image of page 2
Decision to migrate Rural to urban migration International migration Why do people move? Neoclassical theory Individual moves if expected wages are higher than staying New economics theory Decision is at the household level, rather than the individual level (remittances) Method to diversify risk, access to capital 3
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Other factors Network / social capital Previous migrants make it easier (lower the cost) of migrating, increasing the benefits Relative position / deprivation Improving social position is a major goal of migration 4
Background image of page 4
Evidence Stark and Taylor (1989, 1991) Relative depravation in home village increases migration from Mexico to U.S. Absolute depravation increases migration to the U.S. Davis and Winters (2001) Migrant networks (those already established in U.S.) matter Male networks matter for females migrating Female networks influence destination 5
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Policy implications In sending countries Increasing average income and equality of distribution is important In destination countries Previous entries affect current and future flows 6
Background image of page 6
Immigrants are not as large a share of the total population as once were 7 Source: Borjas (1994)
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
But may eventually surpass previous high 8
Background image of page 8
U.S. Immigration Policy 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act suspended immigration of Chinese immigrants for 60 years 1907 “gentleman’s agreement” with Japan T. Roosevelt - California would desegregate Japanese students from their schools, Japan would stop emigration of its citizens 1917 Asian Indian Exclusion 1921 & 1924 Quota Laws Restricted flow from Eastern Europe Visas allocated by national origin of current population (majority UK and Germany) 9
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
U.S. Immigration Policy 1929 National Origins Act limited annual quota of 150,000 immigrants, only 30 percent of which could come from southern and
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/07/2011 for the course ECON 375 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at Maryland.

Page1 / 35

Dec 6 immigration - Immigration 1 Why to individuals...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online