lecture_tan3 - Key Concepts: Lecture 3 Annual Motions of...

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Key Concepts: Lecture 3 Annual Motions of Sun and Stars The Seasons. Example of the Scientific Method Motion and Phases of Moon Annual Motion of the Sun: The Ecliptic • Every day the Sun rises and sets 4 minutes later with respect to the stars • Therefore after one year it returns to the same position relative to the stars Annual Visibility of the Stars The constellations that are visible on a given night are those opposite from the Sun on the celestial sphere Thus you see different stars at different times of the year as the Sun moves along the ecliptic relative to the stars The apparent motion is due to the Earth orbiting the Sun Annual Motion of Sun The sun moves along a repeatable path on the celestial sphere throughout the year. This path is called the ECLIPTIC Sun moves eastward relative to stars on celestial sphere It moves 360 degrees in a year, i.e. about 1 degree per day The constellations through which we see the sun move are the constellations of the ZODIAC The ecliptic is tilted by 23.5 degrees to the celestial equator This apparent motion is due to the Earth orbiting the Sun
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Earth’s rotation axis is tilted by 23.5degrees compared to the direction perpendicular to the Earth’s orbital plane 23.5 ° Annual Motions of the Sun Annual Motions of the Sun The maximum daily altitude (angle above horizon) of the Sun changes with season It reaches a maximum on the summer solstice (June 21 in the northern hemisphere north of the Tropics) Its minimum altitude is reached on the winter solstice
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lecture_tan3 - Key Concepts: Lecture 3 Annual Motions of...

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