lecture_tan27 - Key Concepts: Lecture 27: Relativity...

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Key Concepts: Lecture 27: Relativity Special Relativity General Relativity Falling into a Black Hole Space and Time Before Einstein Galileo and Newton – Space and time are absolute • same grid independent of velocity Velocities simply add together – Nolan sees the ball going 50+40 feet/second 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Time Position Event #1 Event #2 The Problem with Light Speed of light Galileo tried to measure it - by timing a light flash Danish astronomer Olaus Roemer (1675) - Timing moons of Jupiter Americans Michelson and Morley (1887) – The speed of light is the same no matter how fast the observer is moving: EXPERIMENTAL RESULT Michelson-Morley Experiment
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Einstein’s Special Relativity -1905 • Special relativity only applies for situations with no acceleration – An inertial reference frame • First Postulate The physical laws of nature are the same in every inertial reference frame – First stated by Poincaré (1898, 1904) • Second Postulate The speed of light is the same in every inertial reference frame Einstein’s Special Relativity Velocities do not simply add – Light must appear to move at the same speed! Space and time are relative – Distances between and times of events must be different as viewed by different moving observers. Space-Time
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This note was uploaded on 09/07/2011 for the course AST 1002 taught by Professor Dr.haywoodsmith,jr during the Spring '07 term at University of Florida.

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lecture_tan27 - Key Concepts: Lecture 27: Relativity...

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