lecture9_post - Newtons Second Law The acceleration of an...

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Newton’s Second Law ± The acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the net force acting on it and inversely proportional to its mass. or m m α = F aF a r r r r Newton’s Third Law • If object 1 and object 2 interact, the force exerted by object 1 on object 2 is equal in magnitude but opposite in direction to the force exerted by object 2 on object 1. 12 21 = − FF r r
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Friction Forces Contact between bodies with a relative velocity produces friction ± Kinetic friction : the direction of the frictional force is opposite the direction of motion. ± Kinetic friction is proportional to the normal force ± The coefficient of friction µ (‘mu’) depends on the surfaces in contact n f k k µ =
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± Static friction acts to keep the object from moving ± If F increases, so does ƒ s ± If F decreases, so does ƒ s ± ƒ s ƒ s, max with ƒ s, max = μ s n Static Friction ƒ s -F s f = uu ru u r
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Usually, μ s > μ N ƒ s, max = μ s n
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Block on a Ramp ± Axes are rotated as
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This note was uploaded on 09/07/2011 for the course PHY 2053 taught by Professor Buchler during the Spring '06 term at University of Florida.

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lecture9_post - Newtons Second Law The acceleration of an...

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