Lecture-11

Lecture-11 - Lecture 11 Informal fallacies Genetic Ad...

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1. What are ‘informal fallacies’? 2. First three fallacies 3. Further examples Lecture 11 Informal fallacies: Genetic, Ad Hominem, Ad Populam What are ‘informal fallacies’? Common errors of reasoning where the problem is not a formal problem Often related to patterns of reasoning that are not problematic Genetic Fallacy The genetic fallacy is committed when someone attempts to criticize an argument or view or theory not by dealing with it directly, but by citing its (perhaps questionable) origin. Genetic Fallacy Did you see the governor’s plan for bolstering the economy? Most people don’t know this, but this plan is from Sun Tzu’s The Art of War . I don’t think it would be a good idea to plan our economy according to ideas from a book about war. Genetic Fallacy I’ve noticed that everyone who is for abortion has already been born. (Ronald Reagan) Most of the support for tax cuts for higher tax brackets comes from people who are wealthy. So clearly we should oppose these cuts. Ad Hominem This fallacy is committed when the arguer ignores the merits of his/her opponent's argument, and rather makes some reference to the arguer himself/herself, and assumes that this somehow discredits the argument.
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Lecture-11 - Lecture 11 Informal fallacies Genetic Ad...

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