Pineda_slds

Pineda_slds - Social Cognition: Mu Rhythms and Mirror...

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Social Cognition: Mu Rhythms and Mirror Neurons Jaime A. Pineda, Ph.D. Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory COGS1 class
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Research Interest ! Understanding the behavior of others The capacity to achieve internal descriptions of actions and use them to organize one’s own future behaviors ! Neural mechanisms for understanding actions and their intentions ! The effects on learning and social interactions
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Motivating Questions ! How do we understand the actions of others? ! Rationally? ! Intuitively? ! How do we understand first- and third-person experiences? ! Perspective-taking?
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Questions ! What are mirror neurons? ! Can they help us understand actions and their intentions ? ! Are they important for social interactions ? ! How do we study mirror neurons noninvasively ? ! What happens when mirroring systems become dysfunctional ?
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Classic Explanation ! Theory-Theory (argument from analogy; disembodied knowledge; visual hypothesis) ! Involves striate, extrastriate, inferotemporal lobe and superior temporal sulcus, among others
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A New Perspective ! Simulation Theory (Direct-matching hypothesis; embodied knowledge) ! Map visual information onto motor representations of the same action ! Mirroring systems ! bridges between perception and action that allow for simulation ! Mirror neurons ! Mu rhythms
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Mirror Neurons and Mu Rhythms Inferior frontal gyrus Superior temporal sulcus Inferior parietal lobule Sensorimotor cortex normal suppressed Iacoboni and Dapretto, Nature Reviews, 2006,7:942-951 Visual input
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An Observation/Execution Matching System? ! A dysfunctional “mirror system” produces problems in understanding actions Inferior frontal gyrus Superior temporal sulcus Sensorimotor cortex Inferior parietal lobule Visual input
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Biological Motion ! Visual system's ability to recover object information from sparse input ! Gender ! Activity engaged in ! Emotional state
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Biological Motion Perception: Monkeys ! Perret and colleagues (1989; 1990; 1994) Cells in superior temporal polysensory area (STPa) of the macaque temporal cortex appear sensitive to biological motion Oram & Perrett, J. Cog. Neurosci., 1994, 6(2), 99-116
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Biological Motion Perception: Humans ! An area in the superior temporal sulcus (STS) in humans responds to biological motion ! Other areas do as well, including frontal cortex, SMA, insula, thalamus, amygdala Grossman et al. J. Cog. Neurosci., 2000, 12(5), 711-720
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Pineda_slds - Social Cognition: Mu Rhythms and Mirror...

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