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( ) %20Development%20in%20Infancy%20and%20Early %20Childhood.pdf Psychosocial Development in Infancy and Early Childhood What is Psychosocial Development?
as a turning point in development. In Erikson’s view, these conflicts are centered on either developing a psychological quality or failing to develop that quality. During these times, the potential for personal growth is high, but so is the potential for failure. Psychosocial Stage 1 - Trust vs. Mistrust • The first stage of Erikson’s theory of psychosocial development occurs between birth and one year of age and is the most fundamental stage in life. • Because an infant is utterly dependent, the development of trust is based on the dependability and quality of the child’s caregivers. • If a child successfully develops trust, he or she will feel safe and secure in the world. Caregivers who are inconsistent, emotionally unavailable, or rejecting contribute to feelings of mistrust in the children they care for. Failure to develop trust will result in fear and a belief that the world is inconsistent and unpredictable. Psychosocial Stage 2 - Autonomy vs. Shame and Doubt The second stage of Erikson's theory of psychosocial development takes place during early childhood and is focused on children developing a greater sense of personal control.
• Like Freud, Erikson believed that toilet training was a vital part of this process. However, Erikson's reasoning was quite different then, that of Freud's. Erikson believe that learning to control one’s body functions leads to a feeling of control and a sense of independence. • Other important events include gaining more control over food choices, toy preferences, and clothing selection.

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