phil 13

phil 13 - 1 ADVANC E IN FOR MA TION ON MIDTER M EXA M...

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1 ADVANCE INFORMATION ON MIDTERM EXAM PHILOSOPHY 13 FALL, 2007 The midterm exam will take place in our regular classroom (Cog Sci 002) from 10:00 to 10:50 am Monday, October 22. No use of books or notes will be permitted at any time during this exam. We’ll supply paper, on which you will write your exams. The exam will cover all course materials—required readings, lectures, and handouts—up to and including the material for Friday, October 19. Part 1 will consist of essay questions drawn from the list below. On the actual exam 3 of these questions will be posed, and you will be asked to write on one of them. Time allowed: thirty minutes. This portion of the exam counts for 6o per cent of your exam grade. Part 2 will consist of short-answer questions testing your comprehension of course readings and handouts. These questions will be drawn from the list below. On the actual exam, five questions will be posed, and you will be asked to answer three of them. Part 1 Essay questions. 1. Suppose someone asserts that each person possesses an inviolability founded on justice that even the general welfare of society cannot override. Give examples of human rights that might plausibly be deemed inviolable even when violating them would maximally increase human happiness or utility on the whole. State the main arguments Mill develops against this position in chapter 5 of Utilitarianism . Are his arguments sound? Why or why not? 2. At the beginning of chapter 2 Mill interprets utilitarianism as a morality that calls for the maximization of happiness—that is, pleasure and the absence of pain. He then considers the objection that utilitarianism so understood is a doctrine unfit for humans, a doctrine “worthy only of swine.” What objection is Mill raising here? In the next few paragraphs of chapter 2 he presents considerations that aim to rebut the objection. State these considerations. Do they succeed in rebutting the objection? Why or why not? 3. In his essay “Extreme and Restricted Utilitarianism” J. J. C. Smart defends act utilitarianism against rule utilitarianism. Act utilitarianism is the doctrine that one morally ought always to do an act, among the available alternatives, that would lead to an outcome no worse in total utility than
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This note was uploaded on 09/07/2011 for the course PHIL 13 taught by Professor Arneson during the Spring '08 term at UCSD.

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phil 13 - 1 ADVANC E IN FOR MA TION ON MIDTER M EXA M...

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