18-CP-M-DOS-VAX

18-CP-M-DOS-VAX - CP/M DOS VAX/VMS Presenter Tathagata...

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Tathagata Bhattacharjee 1 CP/M DOS VAX/VMS Presenter Tathagata Bhattacharjee
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Tathagata Bhattacharjee 2 History of CP/M What is CP/M? CP/M is an acronym for Control Program for Microcomputers. It is an operating system for 8 bit computers. Gary Kildall needed an OS for a personal computer to test the compiler he was developing for Intel. Developed in 1973 by Gary Kildall Invented as a workaround Based on Intel 8080 processor
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Tathagata Bhattacharjee 3 History of CP/M Originally developed for machines with only floppy drives and 64K memory Intel saw no potential in an OS for personal computers and declined to market it Intel allowed Kildall to keep the rights to the new software Kildall gave Intel the OS he developed for them but they were not convinced that people would want little computers for themselves. Kildall kept the rights to his software and decided to market it himself. He formed Digital Research which was bought by Novell soon after Kildall died in 1994.
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Tathagata Bhattacharjee 4 History of CP/M Entire OS took only 8K of computer’s memory 3 main versions – 1.4, 2.2 and 3.1 8 character file names with 3 character extensions The first 36 MS-DOS system calls mirror CP/M CP/M proved to be very powerful with little hardware demands. CP/M bears a lot of familiarity with MS-DOS, they both have the same 8 character file names with 3 character extensions.
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Tathagata Bhattacharjee 5 Development of CP/M Does not require a disk, monitor or keyboard to operate Created a BIOS module for compatibility OS was separated into 3 logical pieces: Console Command Processor (CCP) Basic Disk Operating System (BDOS) Basic Input/Output System (BIOS) Kildall separated parts of his OS that addressed the specific format of diskettes and placed them in a separate module called the BIOS, thereby achieving cross-platform acceptance for his OS.
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Tathagata Bhattacharjee 6 Development of CP/M Version 2.2 added support for up to 8 drives at 8MB per drive Version 2.2 was the basis of MSDOS Version 2.2 dominated micro computing 16 bit version was CP/M-86 based on Intel 8086 processors In 1978 alone, version 2.2 was sold on more 500,000 computers and by 1980 it seemed hardly conceivable that any other OS would ever be used on Intel-based computers.
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7 Development of CP/M Users could modify OS themselves OS was very cheap Available software included Calc, WordStar and dBASE II 15 second boot up time Users could modify OS to suit themselves or meet their company’s needs. Both OS and hardware was relatively cheaper than available alternatives. Boot up was very fast.
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This note was uploaded on 07/15/2011 for the course ECO 2023 taught by Professor Mr.raza during the Summer '10 term at FAU.

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18-CP-M-DOS-VAX - CP/M DOS VAX/VMS Presenter Tathagata...

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