{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Fountain_Polymers in Fatigue-updated

Fountain_Polymers in Fatigue-updated - Jason E Click to...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Click to edit Master subtitle style An Introduction to Polymers General Overview and Microstructure-based Multistage Fatigue Modeling  of an Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene Copolymer Jason E. Fountai n [email protected]
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Outline q Polymers in general q Types and applications q Crystallinity and damage q Microstructure-based Multistage Fatigue Modeling of Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene q MSF modeling q What is ABS? q ABS microstructure q Monotonic properties q Fatigue q Hysteresis q Temperature generation
Image of page 2
Polymers in General Types and Applications Thermoplastics – melt when heated, easily formed, can be reheated and reformed after processing. (i.e. polycarbonate, Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene) Thermosets – crosslinked polymer, typically after initial processing and formation, heat introduced causes crosslinking which is generally irreversible. (i.e.) Thermoplastic Elastomers – reversible crosslinks through noncovalent bonding, recyclable, durable. (i.e. Poly(styrene-butadiene-styrene) “SBS” Rubber) Used for automotive hoses, shoe soles and tire treads For more please visit: http://www.pslc.ws/mactest/level1.htm Note: the use of polyurethane (thermoplastic) soles is becoming more common now Thermoplastic (left); Crosslinking (right) denoted by black dots in a thermosetting polymer
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Polymers in General Types and Applications Elastomers (Rubbers) elastomer means shows elastic properties , ‘bounce’ back when stretched, can generally undergo large deformations and return to original state. (i.e. polyurethane ‘thermoplastic’ and polybutadiene ‘rubber’, Polysiloxane ‘silicones’ ° Fibers – polymer chains that have been stretched out to linear and typically made up of crystals, can be spun to create threads, have good tensile properties (i.e. Nylons, Kevlar, polyurethanes) For more please visit: http://www.pslc.ws/mactest/level1.htm
Image of page 4
Polymers in General Types and Applications Crosslinked Polymers chemical (vulcanization) or mechanical cross branch of polymer chains, makes elastomers/plastics stronger, but don’t melt leading to difficulties in recycling; reversible crosslinked materials are called thermoplastic elastomers (i.e. polybutadiene, ) For more please visit: http://www.pslc.ws/mactest/level1.htm Composite generally, a component made either synthetically or natural occurring by combining two or more materials of completely different mechanical or chemical compositions that remain separate at the macro or micro scale. (i.e. Carbon fiber, long and thin graphite structure where HCP aromatic rings are aligned, is used with a thermoset epoxy resin, CF is called a composite (Can all materials be considered a composite? Can any material be completely free of inclusions or defects?)
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Polymers in General Thermoplastics Amorphous polymers – random chain orientation, gradual softening with increased Temperature Tg > room temperature ± thermoplastic Tg < room temperature ± elastomer [examples: polycarbonate (PC), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)]
Image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern