Testing a Theory - Running head: TESTING A THEORY 1 Testing...

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Running head: TESTING A THEORY 1 Testing a Theory Angel Bingham PSY/202 August 26, 2011 Rebecca Marek
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TESTING A THEORY 2 Testing a Theory The names of my children have been left out of this test in accordance with their right to anonymity. I too have the right to anonymity and have taken advantage of it in a clinical setting. All patients as well as research participants, are not only given anonymity, but also are all expected to preserve the anonymity of patients and participants as well. In addition to anonymity, all research participants must sign an informed consent prior to partaking in an experiment. This consent explains the study they are participating in, the risks involved, and that their participation is of their own accord, which allows them to cease and desist activity within the experiment at any time. When the risks are minimal, and the study is merely observational, as was the case in my study, an informed consent is not required. Recently, I decided to test a theory based on my children’s behavior in the summertime
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This note was uploaded on 09/07/2011 for the course PSY 201 201 taught by Professor Peters during the Spring '11 term at University of Phoenix.

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Testing a Theory - Running head: TESTING A THEORY 1 Testing...

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