Chap2net - Chapters 2 & 13 Relationships Evolution of...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapters 2 & 13 Relationships Evolution of Personal Selling: Production Orientation Production Before 1930 Characteristics: Sales 1930-1960 Marketing 1960-1990 Partnering 1990-Now Demand exceeds supply. Salesperson Titles: Drummer, Peddler. Characteristics of the sales job: Negotiate price; barter. Evolution of Personal Selling: Sales Orientation Production Before 1930 Characteristics: Sales 1930-1960 Marketing 1960-1990 Partnering 1990-Now Supply catches up; limited competition. Salesman. Get customer to buy; short-term orientation; canned presentations; high pressure manipulation. Salesperson Titles: Characteristics of the sales job: Evolution of Personal Selling: Marketing Orientation Production Before 1930 Characteristics: Sales 1930-1960 Marketing 1960-1990 Partnering 1990-Now Intense competition. Account Executive, Sales Consultant, Marketing Rep., Sales Engineer. Building relationships; adaptive selling; solving problems; long-term orientation; building customer loyalty. Salesperson Titles: Characteristics of the sales job: Evolution of Personal Selling: Partnering Orientation Production Before 1930 Characteristics: Sales 1930-1960 Marketing 1960-1990 Partnering 1990-Now Intense global competition. Salesperson Titles: Value creators, relationship managers. Synergistic relationships with suppliers; long-term relationships with customers and suppliers; internal selling. Characteristics of the sales job: How is the sales role changing? Traditional Salesperson Product oriented Creates customer needs One-way communication Modern Salesperson Customer oriented Uncovers and satisfies customer aggressively pushes products Sells products Short-term sales No after-sales support Works alone needs Two-way communications listens and learns Sells solutions Long-term relationships Emphasizes follow-up service Works with a company team Types of Relationships between Buyers and Sellers Exhibit 2.2 Solo Market Exchange Time horizon Concern for other party Trust Investments in the relationship Nature of the relationship Short term Low Low Low Conflict, bargaining Functional Relationship Long term Low Low Low Cooperation Medium Medium Relational Partnership Long term Medium High Low Accommodation High High Strategic Partnership Long term High High High Coordina-tion High High Risk in relationship Low Potential benefits Low Major Components of Trust and Their Relationship to Partnerships Honesty Dependability Customer Orientation Competence Likeability Trust Bond needed for a partnership 1 Developing Trust: Honesty Honesty is both truthfulness and sincerity. Giving both pros and cons can increase perceptions of honesty. It is okay to not know something Developing Trust: Dependability Dependability Salesperson, product and company he or she represents live up to the promises made. Promises made and kept Consider using: Third-party references Product demonstrations, plant tours, and other special types of presentations. Proof of prior experience and training. 2 Developing Trust: Customer Orientation Customer Orientation Put the customer's needs first Salespeople who think only of making sales are sales oriented rather than customer oriented. Buyers perceive salespeople as customer-oriented when sellers stress benefits, and solutions to problems, over features. 2- Developing Trust: Competence Competence Salespeople know what they are talking about. Requires knowledge of: The customer The product The industry The competition 2- Developing Trust: Likability Behaving in a friendly manner and finding a common ground between buyer and seller. Influenced with personal communications such as birthday cards, handwritten notes, and so forth. 2- Organizational Support Structure and Culture The organizational structure and management provide the necessary support for the salespeople and buyers in a partnering relationship. Training Special training is required to sell effectively in a relationship-building environment. Rewards Reward systems on both sides of the relationship should be coordinated to encourage supportive behaviors. 2- What types of special assistance can a salesperson offer? Serve as consultants, offering advice on store layout. Set up special displays. Provide free demonstrations. Tidy up the shelves and physically restock them. Train a reseller's employees in how to sell the product to final consumers. 13- Guide to Handling Complaints Listen carefully, sympathetically, and without interrupting. Express regret for any inconvenience suffered. Thank you! Reassure the customer that the company wants to do what is fair. Talk about points of agreement. Inquire, investigate, and examine to get the facts. Gain agreement on a solution. Take action as promptly as possible. Educate and resell the customer to forestall future claims. Follow through to see that the action promised has been taken. 13- ...
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This note was uploaded on 09/09/2011 for the course MAR 3391 taught by Professor Garcia,s during the Fall '08 term at University of Central Florida.

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