Republic - Republic(Book II In Plato's Republic(Book II he...

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Republic (Book II) In Plato’s Republic (Book II), he argues that there is ultimately one reason for wars, desire. Plato explains that at the beginning of a society a few people live in a certain area, and will do many different tasks for survival. Eventually, the people will divide labor because it is more beneficial if each individual becomes a master at a certain trade. This division of labor will lead to the need of more people in the community to supply all of its needs.(Plato 70) People will become happy with the variety of goods that they can get, and will eventually put a great demand on the community to obtain more of these. In order to obtain these luxuries more people, resources and land are required. (Plato 71) To satisfy these desires and to living space for all citizens, the growing state will attempt to expand its territory. Eventually, the state will attempt to acquire land that belongs to another, and war will inevitably occur over these lands. (Plato 72) Plato’s stance on the origins of war has merit, and the way he traces every step of a growing state
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This note was uploaded on 04/05/2008 for the course PHILO 101 taught by Professor Leinar during the Spring '08 term at St. Vincent.

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Republic - Republic(Book II In Plato's Republic(Book II he...

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